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50 cents 





SINCE 1909 


APRIL-MAY, 1967 


VOL 58 NO. 2 


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Oncidium Jonesianum 
Rather rare orchid from Tropical America. 



Epidendrum O'Brienianum native to Tropical America 
and widely propagated in United States. 




Phalaenopsis Buyssoniana 
Native of Thailand. 




Cypripedium acaule growing at Doubling G; ^ylvania. 

This hardy species is widely distributed tht U.S. 




Among our Contributors 



Dr. Edward Creutz is vice presi- 
dent for research and development at 
General Atomic Division of General 
Dynamics Corporation with headquar- 
ters in San Diego. He has collected 
orchids in Australia, Tahiti, Fiji, Cen- 
tral America, and Mexico, as well as 
in several parts of the United States. 
He combines this hobby with that of 
color photography, and the color 
photographs included in this issue 
were made by him. 

Frank Mousseau, vice president of 
the San Diego Cactus and Succulent 
Society, is a member of the Bromeliad 
Society and of the San Diego Men's 
Garden Club. He has been making his 
collection of exotic plants since I960. 

James R. Breece, Agricultural Ex- 
tension Service Farm Adviser on com- 
mercial ornamental plant growing and 
turf management, came to San Diego 
from Imperial County. He was earlier 
connected with the state Department 
of Agriculture, Department of Ento- 
mology. 

Carl F. Truby, former president of 
the Rose Society, and his wife are 
ardent rosarians having 300 roses 
which they care for, with the aid of 
their five children. He is also a Con- 
sulting Rosarian and a Rose Judge. 

Mrs. Phyllis Johnson, native of 
Cleveland Ohio, received her educa- 
tion there but has been a long time 
Calif ornian. Coming from the desert 
to San Diego, she, her husband and 
three daughters, were entranced by the 
tropical plants, and enthusiastically 
landscaped their place. She has written 
for American Home, California Home 
and various Curtis publications. 

Hudson T. Hartmann is Professor 
of Pomology, University of California 
at Davis. 

The article on 'Swan Hill' Olive is 
a reprint from California Agriculture, 
January, 1967. 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Vol. 58 



April -May, 1967 



No. 6 



THE COVER 

Use of Cattleya Hybrids for decorating Temuere of Tahiti. 

All photos in color by Edward Creutz. 



FEATURES 

Floral Events ----- 4 

Flower Show Premiums at San Diego Fair 5 

Make Your Soil Before You Plant ]ames R. Breece 6 

Roses — "Those Delightful Miniatures" Marianne & Carl Truby 8 

Orchids — The Universal Flower Edward Creutz 10 

Friend or Foe Phyllis Johnson -13 

San Diego, the Gardening Crossroads Frank Mousseau 14 

"Sharing-of-the-Green" Day 16 

'Swan Hill', a New Ornamental Fruitless Olive .Hudson T. Hartmann 17 

DEPARTMENTS 

A Book in the Hand Alice Mary Greer 18 

San Diego Botanical Garden Foundation Penny Bunker 19 

Floral Committee 200th Anniversary Joan Betts & Alice Zukor 29 

Club Directory - 30 

CALENDAR OF CARE 

Down-to-Earth Gardening Dick Hull 20 

Mary Jane & 

Roses T. Wells Hershey 22 

Irises Betty Springer Van Dusen ....24 

Camellias .Mrs. William DeFrance - -25 

Dahlias Larry Sisk 26 

Fuchsias — - Morrison W . Doty 28 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 

Published Bi-Monthly by the SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION 
Fioral Association Building, Balboa Park, San Diego, California 92101 

All rights reserved. 

Publication Board 

Ch. pro tern; James P. Specht; George A. LaPointe; Mrs. William Mackintosh 



Business Staff 

Business Manager Rosalie F. Garcia 

Office Hours: M-W-F, 10-3 
Phone 232-5762 



Editorial Staff 

Editor ~~ Vera Morgan 

Editorial Office: 9334 Carmichael Dr. 

La Mesa, California 92041 Phone: 466-5090 

Contributing Editors: 

Chauncy I. Jerabek, Alice M. Rainford 
R. Mitchel Beauchamp, Helen V. Witham 

Staff Photographer 
Betty Mackintosh 
Advertising rates on request. Copy deadline, 1st day of the month preceding date of issue. 

California Garden is on the list of publications authorized by the San Diego Retail Merchants Associa- 
tion Entered as second-class matter. Dec. 8, 1910 at the Post Office at San D.ego, California under 
the Act of March 3. 1879. 



Advertising 

Joan Betts, 223-7259 

Mrs. Walter Lang, 286-2601 

Mrs. Adelaide Eastley, 264-5683 



APRIL - MAY, 1967 



FLORAL EVENTS 

APRIL -MAY, 1967 

SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION PROGRAMS 
Third Tuesday, 8 p.m. Floral Building, Balboa Park 

Chairman — Captain Charles E. A. Spiegel 

Regular Meeting, April 18, 1967 

Mr. J. Howard Asper will discuss his newly-introduced Protea planting. These 
have suddenly become the enthusiasm of the plant collector. From South Africa, 
they had been unpredictable here until he succeeded in taming them and is now 
growing them in ever-increasing numbers at his Camellia Nursery north of 
Escondido. 

Regular Meeting, May 16, 1967 

Jane Minshall, Landscape Architect in charge with the San Diego Public Schools, 
will talk on School Landscaping, emphasizing planting design. She will show 
slides of plants used and give reasons for using these combinations of color and 
texture, including ground covers for flat spaces and slopes. 



APRIL 

Mar. 31-Apr. 2 
Fri. 7-10 p.m. 
Sat. 10-9 p.m. 
Sun. 10-5:30 p.m. 

8 

Sat. 10:30-5:30 p.m. 

x 

22-23 

Sat. 2-9 p.m. 

Sun. 10-6 p.m. 

29-30 

Sat. 2-8 p.m. 

Sun. 10-4:30 p.m. 

29-30 



29-30 



29-30 

Sat. 1:30-6 p.m. 

Sun. 11-6 p.m. 

MAY 

7 



13-14 



13-14 



13-27 



25-27 



26-28 



FLOWER SHOWS 

ORCHID SHOW "Orchids on Parade" 
Conference Bldg., Balboa Park 

San Diego County Orchid Society 

LA JOLLA GARDENS TOUR, 31st 
St. James by the Sea Episc. Church 
CHURCH WOMEN 

SPRING ROSE SHOW, 39th ANNUAL 
"Holiday -with Roses" 

Conference Bldg., Balboa Park 

CORONADO FLOWER SHOW, 32nd ANNUAL 
"Springtime in Coronado" 

Spreckels Park, Orange Ave., Coronado 

Coronado Floral Ass'n & City of Coronado 

FLOWER SHOW, 36th ANNUAL 

"Swinging through the Garden Gate" 
Masonic Temple, 427 N. Hill, Fallbrook 

SPRING FLOWER SHOW 

Vista Recreation Center 
Vista Garden Club 

IRIS SHOW "Iris Wonderland" 
Conference Bldg., Balboa Park 

S.D. Imperial Counties Iris Society 

EPIPHYLLUM SHOW 

Los Angeles State & County Arboretum, 
301 N. Baldwin, Arcadia 

FLOWER SHOW, 6th ANNUAL 
"Poway's Posey Parade" 
Valley School Auditorium 

Poway Valley Garden Club 

GERANIUM SHOW 

L. A. S. C. Arboretum, 301 N. Baldwin, Arcadia 

WILDFLOWER SHOW 

Community Hall, Julian 

MISSION VALLEY CENTER FLOWER SHOW 

Mission Valley Center 

Men's Garden Club of San Diego 

BONSAI EXHIBIT 

L. A. S. C. Arboretum, 301 N. Baldwin, Arcadia 



You are invited to 
become a member of 

^Jke J^an <=J-)ieao 

Membership includes: 

• Monthly meetings featuring 
outstanding speakers 

• A monthly Sunday afternoon 
garden tour 

• Subscription to CALIFORNIA 
GARDEN bi-monthly 

• Use of a large horticultural 
library 

Fill in box with membership desired and 

mail with check to 

San Diego Floral Association 
Balboa Park, San Diego, Calif. 92101 

Classification of Memberships: 

Individual $ 5.00 □ 

Family ..$ 5.50 □ 

Sustaining $10.00 □ 

Contributing $25.00 □ 



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ame_ 



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Zip 



■CALIFORNIA 
1 GARDEN 


bi-monthly magazine 


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(add $1 for foreign postage) 


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San Diego, Calif. 92101 


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CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Flo wer Sh o w 
Premiums at 
San Diego Fair 
Hit Record! 



Premium Lists are now available at 
the San Diego County Fair. If you 
want to enter your choice plant ma- 
terials and have not received a Prem- 
ium List through the mail, you can 
write to Entry Dept, San Diego Coun- 
ty Fair, Del Mar and ask for one. 

As usual, the Floriculture Depart- 
ment has the highest sum for prem- 
iums, $29,905. However this does not 
mean that you have an opportunity to 
reap an astronomical award for your 
cherished plant because that plant will 
meet stiff competition from a lot of 
other well-grown specimens. 

The Floriculture Department, un- 
der able Bob Lamp, is world-renowned 
for the variety and quality of its en- 
tries as well as the record multiplicity 
of classes under which your plant can 
be entered. 

So start looking over your choice 
specimens in relation to the Entry List, 
and judge where you think your plant 
will fare best. Then get busy right 
away because entries close on June 1st. 

If, perchance, you don't walk away 
with a Blue Ribbon, you do have the 
opportunity of comparing your darling 
with the other entries in its class, — 
perhaps of meeting some of the other 
growers of like materials. Just start 
a conversation with someone you meet 
hanging around that exhibit where 
your plant is resting, and it is likely 
that you have met another enthusiastic 
grower of your hobby plant also, who 
is gazing as fondly on his entry as 
you are on yours. 



SAN DIEGO COUNTY FAIR 

and Southern California Exposition 



DON'T MISS THIS 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY FAIR. 

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED BY YOUR 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN 

MAGAZINE 




presents 

THE WEST'S LARGEST 

OUTDOOR FLOWER 

AND GARDEN SHOW 

Beneath several acres of green 
shade cloth in an atmosphere of 
serene harmony, one can see the 
largest selection of specimen plants, 
blooms, arrangements, hanging bas- 
kets and individual landscape de- 
sign exhibits ever assembled at the 
same time in such a natural setting 
of beauty and pageantry of color. 
There is approximately $30,000 
awarded in cash premiums to Junior 
and Senior competitors. 

For Premium List write: 

Entry Supervisor, Fairgrounds 

Del Mar, California 92014 

ENTRIES CLOSE JUNE 1 

visit and enjoy— 

the liveliest 
days of the year 

JUNE 23 THRU JULY 4 

AT DEL MAR 



APRIL -MAY, 1967 



Make Your Soil 
Before You Plant 



by James R. Breece 



WHAT is a soil mixture? We 
mix together materials to 
achieve a desirable growing 
media. Generally we think of soil 
mix as a natural field soil to which 
other materials have been added to 
change its physical and chemical char- 
acteristics. However, some soil mix- 
tures, such as the U.C.* mixes, have 
no natural soil. 

The value of a selected soil mix- 
ture is often discussed by horticultur- 
ists. One may praise the merits of a 
certain soil mixture, while another 
will praise equally the merits of other 
soil mixtures. 

'■'••University of California Manual 23 



What are the characteristics of a 
desirable soil mix? A good soil mix 
provides the following conditions for 
ideal growth of horticultural crops. 

1. Increase air space for good 
aeration. Roots respire; oxygen is con- 
sumed and carbon dioxide is released. 
Aeration is the process of gaseous ex- 
change between aerial atmosphere and 
root zone. The greater the amount 
of air space in the soil, the faster the 
diffusion will be. Heavy clay soil, 
compacted soil, and poorly drained 
soils do not have a high per cent of 
air space. These soils require special 
management for acceptable plant 




growth to occur. Heavy foot or wheel 
traffic in turf areas compacts the soil 
thus reducing air spaces. These areas 
require frequent aerification and bulky 
soil amendments. 

The critical level of air space is 
10%; however, most plants would 
do better at a higher per cent of air 
space. Good soil mixes insure ade- 
quate air space and provide means of 
resisting compaction. 

2. Increase water drainage. Drain- 
age is important for at least three rea- 
sons, (a) Good drainage is needed to 
carry away the excess salts. Most of 
our water contains salts. If these salts 
are not leached away the salts are 
likely to accumulate and become toxic 
to the plants, (b) Poor drainage will 
decrease the rate of diffusion of oxy- 
gen through the soil, (c) Plant roots 
become more susceptible to attack by 
disease-causing organism. The plants 
may be able to outgrow the attack of 
some plant pathogens in a well-drained 
soil. In a water-logged soil, the roots 
are not growing fast enough to out- 
grow a fungus attack. 

3. Adequate water availability. 

Pure coarse sand certainly provides 
air space and drainage, but sandy soil 
needs to be watered frequently. Sandy 
soils do not retain much water. A high 
per cent of this retained water is 
available to the plant, but there is not 



Planting in Prepared Soil. 

Photo Courtesy Union Tribune 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



enough available water to sustain a 
plant when water loss is rapid. Clay 
soil would retain more water and re- 
lease more to a plant than an equal 
volume of sandy soil. A clay soil 
would also have a high per cent of 
water that was unavailable to the plant. 
Clay soils also retain a high per cent 
of nutrients, whereas sandy soils are 
likely to have nutrients leached out. 

Why don't we use clay soils if they 
retain water and nutrients? Back to 
the first two essential factors for a 
desirable soil. Air space and good 
drainage are very important. It is 
easier for the horticulturist to supply 
water and nutrients to soil mix that 
has good drainage and a high per cent 
f air space than to manage a soil 
with poor drainage and little air space. 

4. Low weight for handling and 
shipping. This factor is important to 
nurserymen or anyone who moves con- 
tainers. Light weight soil is impor- 
tant for planter boxes on top of build- 
ings. Organic matter lightens the 
weight of clay and sandy soils. 

What are soil amendments? Soil 
amendments are materials that improve 
the soil by changing the physical or 
chemical properties of soil. Note that 
there was no mention of nutrients. 
An amendment may have some nu- 
trient value, but the main purpose is 
physical and chemical change of soil. 
Amendments to change the physical 



o 



properties of a soil may be organic 
or inorganic. Examples of organic 
soil amendments are sawdust shavings, 
processed wood products, manure, 
mushroom compost, peat and sludges; 
inorganic amendments include vermic- 
ulite, perlite, and sand. These amend- 
ments change physical properties by 
enlarging the pore spaces. A large 
amount of the amendment may be 
needed. For example, some soils need 
up to 60% sawdust or shavings be- 
fore the physical properties are defi- 
nitely improved. 

Chemical properties of soil can be 
changed, but chemical amendments 
can be useful for only specific prob- 
lems. 

A soil with excess sodium can be 
improved by adding gypsum, sulfur, 
sulfuric acid, and sulfate. If you sus- 
pect an excess of sodium in your soil 
you should have the soil analyzed to 
determine how much of this kind 
of amendment should be added to 
the soil. 

The University of California Agri- 
cultural Extension Service office has 
a leaflet that explains how to test your 
soil for excess sodium. The name of 
this leaflet is "Gypsum and Other 
Chemical Amendments for Soil Im- 
provement." This publication is free 
of charge from your Farm Advisor 
Office, Building 4, 5555 Overland 
Avenue, San Diego, Calif. 92123. 



NEW PUBLICATIONS 
AVAILABLE AT THIS OFFICE 

Managing Layered and Compacted 

Soil. 
Soil Management on Hardpan and 

Claypan. 
Know Your Turf grass. 
Which is the Best Turf Grass? 

A soil with a pH of 5, or lower, 
is considered a very acid soil. Some 
seeds and rooted cuttings do poorly 
in extremely acid soils. Liming of such 
soils will increase the pH and bring 
down the acidity. Amendments to in- 
crease pH are: oyster shells, quicklime, 
hydrated lime, and limestone. 

Soil amendments can be used in 
establishing a new lawn. The addi- 
tion of 25-30% organic matter of 
the soil volume is often used on our 
mesa soils. This amounts to about 
l-ll//' °f organic matter spread even- 
ly over the area and cultivated from 
4 to 6" deep. 

One parting bit of advice. Sand 
is not a good amendment for im- 
proving clay soils. The mixture would 
need about 90% sand before the soil 
would be changed. 

Which soil mix is best for con- 
tainers? Only you can decide which 
soil mix is best for your needs. I 
can only suggest mixtures. The fol- 
lowing is a table giving the five basic 
U. C. Soil Mixes for container-grown 
plants: 



Soil 
Mix 



A 



B 



C 



D 



Ingredients, 

percent by 

volume 



Fine 
sand 



100 



75 



50 



25 







Peat 
Moss :; 







25 



50 



75 



100* 



THE FIVE BASIC U. C.t SOIL MIXES 



Weight, pounds 
per cubic foot 



At maxi- 
mum 
water 
content*' 



117 



105 



94 



66 



Oven- 
dry 



89 



76 



63 



34 



43 



7 



Maximum water 
content- 



Percent 

by 
volume 



43 



46 



48 



51 



59 



Percent 

by 
weight 



30 



38 



48 



94 



530 



pH with 

fertilizer 

added 



7.0 



6.8 



6.5 



6.0 



5.7 



Approx. 

cost per 
cubic 
yard 



$2.00 



3.19 



4.37 



5.56 



$6.75 



Comments and 
Suggested Uses 



Seldom used; densest and least 
retentive of nutrients; for cans, 
flats, beds. 



Commonly used; good physical 
properties; for cans, flats, beds. 



Commonly used; excellent physi- 
cal properties; for pots and beds. 



Light weight; excellent aeration; 
for pots and beds. 



Very light weight; used for aza- 
leas, sometimes gardenias and 
camellias. 



♦Redwood shavings may be used for part of the peat in mix E to improve aeration and reduce cost. Redwood shavings 
or sawdust or rice hulls may also be used for some or all of the peat in other mixes. 

**Maximum water content, and weight at that moisture level, are typical for a 6-inch column of a mixture of fine 
sand of the Oakley series and Canadian peat moss. 

tUniversity of California Manual 23. 



APRIL -MAY, 1967 



ROSES 



U nose JLjclioiktrul <yViiniatu 



ff 



res 



by Marianne and Carl Truby 



LATELY there has been a quick 
growth of interest in miniature 
roses. Many Rose Shows have 
increased their miniature sections and 
have broadened the classes to include 
many colors as well as potted plants. 
Miniature roses are being stocked by 
nurserymen who never had stocked 
them before, not to mention the in- 
creased volume of mail order sales. 




Thimble Arrangement of Miniature 
Rose Lori Nan. 

Photo Courtesy of Ralph Moore, Visalia 



Buyers are attracted by the petite little 
flowers, with their everblooming habits, 
hardiness and their practical use as 
potted plants, borders, window boxes 
and unusual containers. 

The search for better varieties has 
been long and trying but with rewards, 
and at least one California hybridizer 
(Mr. Ralph Moore of Sequoia Nur- 
series, Visalia, California) has pro- 
duced several exciting miniature roses. 
Some of these are; (Red) Beauty 
Secret, and Little Buckaroo; (Pink) 
Eleanor and June Time; (Yellow) 
Yellow Doll and Bit O' Sunshine; 
(White) Jet Trail and Easter Morn- 
ing; (Orange red) Jeanie Williams 
and New Penny. 

Other varieties new and now being 
grown in this area for the first time 
are Chipper an orange red, Mary 
Adair a blushing apricot, Debbie 
with colors similar to those of the 
popular Peace rose, and Cri Cri a 
double coral salmon. 

Miniature rose fanciers may also 
grow miniature tree roses and minia- 
ture climbers. There are now available 
22 varieties of miniature tree roses and 
7 miniature climbers. This writer 
recommends Beauty Secret (red) and 
Eleanor (pink) in the tree varieties 
and Hi Ho (red) and Pink Cameo 
(pink) in the climbers. 



All types of miniatures will grow 
and bloom in about any environment 
that the bigger roses do — however, 
for the best results we have found the 
following to be most satisfactory. Find 
a spot in your garden where they will 




Arrangement in 3" vase, the large 
bud "Elinor," two small buds, "New 
Penny" Grown by Carl Truby. 

Betty Mackintosh 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



get morning but only partial after- 
noon sun. Try to keep away from 
fences or walls and preferably plant 
them where the air circulates freely. 
If your miniatures are in containers 
then place them up off the ground on 
a bench or platform for reasons to 
be explained later. 

The best medium for container- 
grown miniatures is one/third good 
garden soil, one/third sand and one/ 
third peat moss. Be sure to place 
some coarse gravel in the bottom to 
allow for good drainage. After your 
plant is established or about six weeks 
from date of planting, you can ob- 
tain excellent results by fertilizing with 
fish emulsion used at half strength. 
Miniature roses love fish emulsion 
and should be fed about once a month. 
Remember always water your plant at 
least 4 hours prior to fertilizing or 
spraying. 

Even though miniature roses are 
tough little plants they need help in 
their battle with the bugs. Of course, 
good sanitation can lessen your pest 
problems especially if you place your 
containers up off the ground as men- 
tioned earlier. Many insects find the 
soil and grass excellent homes while 
waiting for something better to hap- 
pen by and if our plants are off the 
ground, then the route is more diffi- 
cult. The two most troublesome pests 
are aphids and red spider mites, and 
each are controlled with Malathion 
(50% liquid). Always cover the plant 
completely and repeat the treatment 
once each week for 3 weeks. Mildew 
is rarely a problem where ventilation 
is good, however if you must spray 
for mildew then I recommend Or- 
thorix at l]/ 2 teaspoons per gallon 
of water. 

Now that we have the best minia- 
ture roses available and are caring 
for them properly, we can expect some 
beautiful little flowers (blooms) wor- 



thy of sharing with others. Each year, 
generally the spring months, rose 
shows throughout southern California 
gladly accept miniature roses for ex- 
hibition. The rules are quite simple. 
Cut your stem so that the foliage and 
bloom complement each other and are 
balanced. The bloom should be from 
one-half to three-fourths open and 
fresh and crisp. Be sure to clean 
both bloom and foliage of dust or 
other distracting materials. Quite often 
it is necessary for the exhibitor to fur- 
nish his own container for specimen 
miniature blooms so perhaps it would 
be wise to take a small pill bottle or 
a tiny vase to display your blooms in. 
In addition to cut flowers some shows 
also provide for showing potted minia- 
ture roses. In this case the container 
should be of simple design and of 
about 6 inch size. 

The four best varieties for exhibit- 
ing according to this exhibitor are 
Beauty Secret (red) Eleanor (pink) 
Mary Adair (Apricot) and Jet Trail 

(White). 

With more and more people living 
in apartments, mobile homes and 
homes with reduced space, we see a 
very bright future for miniature roses. 

Constant effort will be made to 
originate varieties which are more 
disease resistant and trouble free. With 
the exciting new colors and continued 
success of the plant breeders, a minia- 
ture rose exactly for you is now wait- 
ing to add to your happy home and 
garden. 



NEW 

"GREEN THUMB 

CALENDAR 



•>•> 



Miniature Rose Beauty Secret. Letter 
Opener Beside Bowl Indicates Size 
of Arrangement. 

— Photo Courtesy of 
Ralph Moore, Visa I /a 



A revised edition of the "Green 
Thumb Calendar" edited by Joan Betts 
is now co-ordinated with the Official 
Calendar of Flowers, Plants and Trees 
for the 200th Anniversary Committee 
celebration. It features a picture in 
color of the new yellow rose desig- 
nated as San Diego's own in honor of 
the 200th Anniversary in 1969. The 
name of the rose has not yet been offi- 
cially announced pending its registra- 
tion by the originators, Armstrong's of 
Ontario under Dr. David Armstrong. 

The Calendar is a project of the 
Womens' Committee to the San Diego 
Symphony to benefit their program of 
Childrens' and Youths' Concerts and 
in recognition of the editor who is 
Chairman of the Floral Committee of 
the 200th Anniversary Celebration. If 
you wish to procure a copy, ask your 
friends who are selling them or mail 
your check for $1.10 to: Office, San 
Diego Symphony Orchestra Associa- 
tion, P.O. Box 3175, San Diego, Cali- 
fornia 92103. The cost is $1.00 plus 
.04 cents tax and the postage. It makes 
a lovely gift to yourself and to your 
gardening friends. 




APRIL -MAY, 1967 



ORCHID 



THE UNIVERSAL 
FLOWER 



by Edward Creutz 



IF NATURE ever had in mind the 
universal flower, she came close 
to realizing it in creating orchids. 
The number of wild species is prob- 
ably exceeded only by the number of 
the compositae, that is, the daisy-like 
flowers. The number of orchid fam- 
ily members has been variously esti- 
mated at 15,000 to 30,000, and 24,- 
000 is a good average of expert opin- 
ions. They are found in the tropics 
but also in Greenland. They live in 
swamps and rain forests but also in 
deserts and in the water (Habenaria, 
Venezuela) . They grow on trees but 
also on rocks, in the soil, and almost 
totally underground {Rhizanthella 
Gardneri and Cryptanthemis Slateri, 
Australia). They may be so small 
that the whole plant provides a con- 
venient boutonniere or so large that 
they climb trees hundreds of feet high. 
They may be lavender in color, but all 
colors except black are known. 



* 



* 



BOTANY 

What is an orchid ? Botanically, it is 



a member of the family Orchidaceae 
(the end of which is pronounced 
by saying the letters of the word, ace) , 
which in turn is part of the order 
Mkrospermae, which means very small 
seeds. Small they are indeed since 
those of many species are less than 
10 thousandths of an inch in diameter, 
and it would require five hundred 
million to weigh a pound. Nearly 
four million have been estimated in a 
single seed pod of Cycnoches chloro- 
chtlon. These tiny seeds consist only 
of bits of vital protoplasm with no 
food supply. Growth is therefore a 
matter of small chance since they de- 
pend on being carried by the wind to 
a suitable location where not only 
food and moisture are available ah 
initio but also a species of fungi 
which helps them absorb nutrients in 
some unknown and wondrous way. 
A further difficulty the embryo plant 
must overcome is that it has no roots 
for several days after germination. 

Another almost unique characteris- 
tic of the orchids is that, unlike most 
flowers with their clearly separated 
stamens and pistils, their sex organs 



are combined in one structure called 
the column or gynandrium, more or 
less centered in the flower where you 
would expect stamens and pistils to 
be found. A small even number (2, 
4, 6, or 8) of pollen sacs (pollinia) 
are found near the end of the column, 
while the female external parts, called 
stigmatic surfaces, are areas of the 
outer sheath of the column, isolated 
from the pollinia by a protruberance 
on the column called the rostellum. 
This unusual arrangement of the sex- 
ual machinery is typical of the length 
to which orchids go to avoid self- 
pollination, as though their extremely 
varied forms and habits could be main- 
tained and propagated only by insist- 
ing on a high probability of cross- 
fertilization. Additional tricks used 
by various species of orchids for this 
purpose include narrow passageways 
arranged so that an insect is trapped 
after alighting on the flower. Thus, 
it must pass the stigma and then the 
pollinia, in that order, so that pollen 
retained from a previous encounter 
with another flower comes in contact 
with the stigma of the new one. Other 



10 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



tricks are used to ensure that only one 
species of insect of the likely size and 
shape to effect pollination will visit 
the flower. Several flowers have the 
appearance of female insects (e.g., 
Scolia ciliata) so that the male of this 
species will be attracted and carry out 
the pollination act using the pollinia 
that became attached to his body dur- 
ing a previous misdirected attempt to 
fertilize his own kind. 

The casual observer need not notice 
the size of the seed or even the ab- 
sence of separate stamens and pistils 
to be able to recognize a flower as 
being an orchid. In general, there 
are three colored sepals arranged in 
a whorl, inside of which are three 
colored petals in a second whorl. The 
three sepals usually are of the same 
general shape, as are two of the petals, 
while the third petal is most imag- 
inatively modified. The petal is fre- 
quently developed into a pouch or 
lip, multicolored, fringed, tasseled, or 
decorated in some interesting manner. 

As the flower bud is developing, 
the petal that is to become the lip is 
normally at the top. The lip makes 
a good landing place for insects, and 
since having the lip at the top would 
be an inconvenient arrangement, the 
flower stems of most orchids twist 
around 180° during the develop- 
ment of the bud. This twisting pro- 
cess is called resupination. In some 
species the obvious landing point is 
the lip at the top of the flower after 
the bud has opened. In these cases 
the flower stem twists a total of 360° 
as the bud is developing, as though 
the orchid wants to do the twist 
whether it really needs to or not. 
Another general characteristic of or- 
chids is that their roots are fleshy and 
consist of a central fibre covered with 
a strongly water-absorbing layer called 
velamen. This remarkable tissue con- 
tains a number of air reservoirs that 
appear as whitish flecks after the root 
is thoroughly moistened and has 
gained a general greenish color. 

The flowering season, even for vari- 
ous members of a given genus (for 
example, Cymbidium), may range 
throughout the year, depending on the 
species. Thus, by selecting a dozen 
or so varieties, since the flowers last 
on the plants for weeks, it is possible 
to have flowers the entire year. Hy- 
brids may flower more than once a 
year, following the habits of both 
parents, or some other indefinite 
scheme. The flowering period of cer- 
tain Cattleya and Dendrobium phalae- 
nopsis individuals is known to be 
hastened by shortening the length of 



the light period during the 24-hour 
cycle. In this case sufficient light in- 
tensity must be given to compensate 
for the shorter period. Too high tem- 
peratures during the day, or night 
temperatures appreciably under those 
listed below under "Culture," may pre- 
vent blooming entirely. 



* 



>f 



CLASSIFICATION 



Orchids are classified broadly into 
four types depending on their habi- 
tat: (1) the terrestrials live with their 
roots in the soil, much as many other 
plants. Typical genera are Cypripe- 
dium, the mostly hardy lady-slippers; 
Paphiopedilu?n, their usually tropical 
cousins similar in appearance to Cypri- 
pedium and therefore frequently called 
cyps out of association; and the easily 
grown Bletilla of the Orient. (2) The 
epiphytes live in trees, usually in 
rather thick jungle, apparently to en- 
hance the amount of light they re- 
ceive. The roots ramble over the bark 
surface and are exposed to the atmos- 
phere, drying out thoroughly between 
rain showers. To compensate for this 
drying phenomenon the epiphytes 
usually have enlargements of the leaf 
stems called pseudobulbs, which, like 
a camel's hump, can store food and 
water for long periods. Typical of 
these are Cattleyas, Oncidiums, and 
Odontoglossums. (3) The lithophytes 
are similar to the epiphytes, and 
spread their roots on the surface of 
more or less bare rocks. (4) the sap- 
rophytes live on decaying animal or 
vegetable material, for example, on 
rotting logs. Their all-white leaves 
and stems contain no chlorophyll. Ex- 
amples are Corallorhiza and Galeola. 
Possibly the occasional occurrences of 
these plants growing on the corpses 
of dead animals have lead to the myths 
about man-eating orchids. 



^< 



* 



CULTURE 

Contrary to some popular beliefs, 
orchids are not difficult to grow, at 
least not in the sense that the grower 
must know some mystical procedures 
to make them thrive. However, like 
all cultivated plants, they need atten- 
tion to their requirements, which are 
easily understood if their particular 
natural habitat is considered. The de- 
tails, of course, depend on the species. 



In general, orchids need the following 
things : 

Air. They need gently moving fresh 
air. Much like people, they are suscep- 
tible to diseases if enclosed for a long 
time in stagnant air. 

Light. They need large quantities 
of diffused light, usually not direct 
sunlight that would burn the leaves. 
Light coming through lattices, screens, 
or partly white-washed glass with a 
transmission of about 50% is good. 

Temperature. They need a definite 
difference between day and night 
temperatures. The maximum accept- 
able day temperature is dependent on 
the relative humidity. Temperatures 
above 80 °F are likely to be harmful 
unless the relative humidity is at least 
60%. The acceptable minimum night 
temperature depends on the species, 
which, except for the hardy species 
which are deciduous and overwinter 
as rooted corms underground, are 
usually divided into three classes for 
this purpose: the cool orchids, whose 
night temperature should not be less 
than 45°F; the intermediate, 55°F; 
and the warm, 65 °F. 

Moisture. The terrestrial orchids 
and the saprophytes, which usually 
have no pseudobulb storehouses for 
water, should have some moisture con- 
tinuously at the roots. The epiphytes 
and lithophytes, on the other hand, 
should be thoroughly watered periodic- 
ally only after the roots have dried 
out. This may be twice a week or 
twice a month, depending on the size 
of the pot, the kind of potting ma- 
terial, and the ambient relative hu- 
midity. Continuous moisture on their 
roots invariably will lead to rot. The 
healthy looking greenish color of 
damp roots must be a passing phase 
only. If the roots are not allowed to 
return soon to their dry whitish condi- 
tion, the plants will die. However, 
a continuous supply of water vapor in 
the air for all types is most desirable 
and, as mentioned above, is essential 
if the temperature is high. The re- 
quirement for water vapor means that 
some form of humidification, either 
automatic in the greenhouse or almost 
daily spraying of the foliage in the 
home or garden, is necessary. 

Rest. Although a few species of 
orchids bloom nearly continuously, 
this is exceptional; most require a 
period of rest with reduced moisture 
immediately after flowering is com- 
plete. The length of this rest is de- 
termined by the length of the dry 
period that follows the rainy season 
in the plant's natural setting. It may 



APRIL -MAY, 1967 



11 



vary from a few weeks to several 
months. 

Potting Material. Here, as in every- 
thing else concerned with orchid cul- 
ture, the plant should be treated as 
much as possible as though it had 
never left its original home. The epi- 
phytes and lithophytes do well in 
shredded fir tree bark, compact chunks 
of roots of the osmunda fern, slabs of 
the porous trunks of tree ferns, or, 
if particular care is taken as to feed- 
ing and watering, even gravel. The 
important thing is that the potting 
material should be capable of drying 
out thoroughly. Terrestrials and sap- 
rophytes need a material that holds 
a little moisture continuously. The ma- 
terials suggested for epiphytes could 
be used only if watered daily or nearly 
so. For terrestrials and saprophytes it 
is therefore convenient to add sphag- 
num moss, decayed leaves, small 
amounts of peat moss, or other water- 
absorbing materials. However, it is 
important that the potting material 
not be continuously soggy, since a 
certain amount of air must penetrate 
it. The pot itself can be of ordinary 
clay or plastic, but the drainage hole 
in the bottom should be opened up 
considerably to increase the circulation 
of air and avoid the retention of too 
much moisture. 

Fertilizer. Again, the conditions of 
the orchid's original home should be 
thought of. Nutrients come from slow 
decay of tree bark or slow solution of 
minerals in rocks by rainwater, and 
there is little chance for a concen- 
trated dose of food. Therefore, fer- 
tilizer must be applied in greater dilu- 
tion and with greater frequency than 
would be satisfactory for most plants. 
In general, fertilizers high in nitrogen 
and diluted at least twice as much as 
recommended for garden flowers are 
applied every two weeks, after a 
thorough watering to remove the resid- 
ual salts from the previous fertiliza- 
tion. 

Propagation. Although most com- 
mercial orchids are now grown from 
seed, this procedure is not for the 
average amateur. Many orchids can 
be divided with a sharp knife into 
clumps of no less than three or four 
pseudobulbs each, and the sections re- 
potted. The terrestrials, which do not 
have pseudobulbs, produce additional 
growths each year, and when several 
of these have accumulated they may 
also be separated into groups of two 
or three. Other orchids produce plant- 
lets directly on the stems. These 
should be allowed to stay on the 



stems until several roots have ap- 
peared, and then potted. These little 
plants are called keikis (the Ameri- 
canized plural of the Hawaiian word 
for child). 



* 



* 



PROBLEMS AND REMEDIES 

If growths are soft, dark, and 
spindly, not enough light is available. 

Large brown or black areas on the 
leaves indicate burning from too much 
direct sunlight. 

Snails can be controlled through a 
metaldehyde poison. 

Aphids, scale, thrips, and mealy 
bugs can be destroyed by spraying 
with nicotine or DDT. 

Roots that are soggy and do not 
grow signify that there is too much 
or too continuous moisture in the pot. 

If the pseudobulbs shrink and 

shrivel, the roots have rotted from 

too much moisture, or the relative 
humidity is too low. 



^< 



* 



USES 



Orchids have been recognized in 
official capacities. Cypripedium reginae 
(the Queen's Slipper) is the state 
flower of Minnesota; Ly caste virginal is 
forma alba, "la Monja Blanca" (the 
White Nun), is the national flower of 
Guatemala; Cattleya labiata variety 
Dowiana ("la Guaria Morada") and 
Cattleya Skinneri ("la nor de San 
Sebastian") are both variously used 
as the national flower of Costa Rica; 
and Laelia purpurata is the national 
flower of Brazil. 

Orchids have decorated postage 
stamps of Brazil, Ceylon, Honduras, 
Guatemala, and China. 

The largest island of the Hawaiian 
chain is known as the orchid isle. 
Most of its orchids are descendants of 
fairly recent immigrants and are mix- 
tures of several races, as are many of 
its beautiful women. 

The most common commercial or- 
chid is Vanilla planifolia, whose dried 
seed pods provide the aromatic flavor- 
ing. Salep, a bland food, is made from 
dried and ground tubers of the genus 
Orchis. Other typical uses are: 



Vegetables: Anoectochilus, in Ma- 
laya and Indonesia. 

Tea: Jumellea, in the Mascarene 
Islands, Madagascar. 

Medicines: Epipactis latifol/a, in the 
United States. 

Glue: Cyrtopodium, in Brazil. 

Religious talismans and love po- 
tions: Coelogyne asperata, in Borneo; 
Cymbidium Finlaysonianum, in Ma- 
laya; and Grammatophyllum scrip turn, 
in the Philippines. 

But the greatest popularity of or- 
chids is for the pleasure they give in 
displaying their unusual habits and 
their remarkable flowers. Since they 
grow all over the world, they make 
good souvenirs of trips and may be 
imported after proper arrangements 
have been made with their own gov- 
ernmental bodies and the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. After importa- 
tion and the obligatory fumigation, 
they should be washed, mercilessly 
root-pruned, potted, and kept rather 
dry for several weeks before a regu- 
lar routine of fertilizing and watering 
is begun. Decoration of the female 
human species is perhaps the best 
known use of orchids, and this pur- 
pose is adequate reason for many 
people to grow them for whatever 
return — esthetic, emotional, or 
economic — they may bring. 



■¥. 



X- 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

The American Orchid Society Journal, 1932 
to present. 

Correll, D. S., Native Orchids of North 
America, Ronald Press, New York, 1950. 

Dunsterville, G. C. K., Introduction to the 
World of Orchids, Doubleday and Com- 
pany, Inc., New York, 1964. 

"The Evolution of the Orchid Flower," 
American Orchid Society Bulletin 14, 
355-360 (1946). 

Hawkes, A. D., Orchids: Their Botany and 
Culture, Harper and Row, New York, 
I960. 

Pritchard, A. Earl, "California Greenhouse 
Pests and their Control," University of 
California Agricultural Experimental Sta- 
tion Bulletin 713, 1949. 

Seymour, E. L. D. (ed.), New Garden En- 
cyclopedia, Wm. H. Wise and Com- 
pany, 1943. 

Skinner, C. M., Myths and Legends of 
Flowers, Trees, Fruits, and Plants in 
All Ages and in All Climes, J. B. Lip- 
pincott Company, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, 1911. 

Withner, C. L., The Orchids, Ronald 
Press, New York, 1959. 



12 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Friend Or Foe 



by Phyllis Conner Johnson 



IN THE midst of jubilation that 
spring or summer has arrived do 
you ever feel concern that every- 
thing in the garden is going to the 
bugs ? 

You are not alone in your concern, 
and there is something that you can 
do about the situation — using na- 
ture's own method of control. 

There is nothing wrong with in- 
sects providing that they are the right 
kind — helpful. The Praying Mantis 
Stagmomantis sp. and the Ladybug 
California Ladybird Beetle Coccinella 
transversa guttata calif omica can be two 
of your best friends. Many gardeners, 
flower growers, and farmers will testi- 
fy to this. The City of Los Angeles 
Park System uses several million Lady- 
bugs every summer. Several tons of 
these carnivorous little friends are used 
by farmers and growers in California, 
Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Okla- 




homa, Nebraska, Idaho, Florida, Ohio 
and other states every year. Foreign 
countries, Mexico in particular, are 
importing hundreds of gallons yearly 
for more economical and tighter con- 
trol on various crops. 

In the valleys of the far west, espe- 
cially in California, there is born in 
April and May, a tiny white form of 
life so small as to be invisible. At 
once it begins to eat: tiny organisms, 
eggs and insects fall prey to the vora- 
cious appetite of the Ladybug larvae. 
The life span of the small red Lady- 
bug is approximately one year and 
during this length of time, whenever 
they are where there is food, they 
eat. Forty to fifty aphids a day is not 
an unusual intake for them, and this 
is their favorite food. A depleted sup- 
ply of aphids does not stop them, 
however, for they consume a variety 
of other insects such as: bollworm, 
leafworm, leafhoppers, fruit scales, 
and corn ear worm. They eat only 
the eggs and larvae of some of these 
if the adults are too large to handle. 
Cotton farmers of Texas have found 
the Ladybug to be their most sat- 
isfactory answer to control the boll- 
worm. The Ladybug will not harm 
vegetation, being only a meat eater. 
When Ladybugs run out of food they 
hibernate in the hills. 

The Ladybug, being a native to this 
country, will survive anywhere unless 
killed off by poison spray, but in such 




California Ladybird Beetle, Cocclnel- 
la transver so guttata calijornka, at- 
tacking an aphis on a chrysanthemum 
leaf. Betty Mackintosh 



Praying Mantis, Stagmomantis sp., 
by the late Lee Passmore. 

Courtesy of the 
San Diego Natural History Museum. 



case they may be replaced at a much 
lower cost than that of the sprays. 

The mantis, commonly called Pray- 
ing Mantis, has a characteristic posi- 
tion of sitting back on the rear ap- 
pendages, and holding its front ap- 
pendages in the attitude of prayer. 
Actually it is laying in wait for its 
prey, which is snapped up with a 
lightning pass of the powerful fore- 
legs. In this it differs from the Lady- 
bug, who is constantly on the prowl 
for food. 

The Chinese Praying Mantis was 
imported into California and north 
eastern United States from Asia. They 
have enormous appetites. In the young 
stage they eat soft-bodied insects such 
as flies, aphids and small caterpillars. 
As they grow larger themselves they 
consume larger insects. Later in the 
season they are eating grasshoppers 
and large beetles as well as the smaller 
insects. They will eat most any in- 
sect with the exception of ants, and 
(Continued on page 13) 



APRIL -MAY, 1967 



13 



SAN DIEGO 

The Gardening Crossroads of the World 



by Frank Mousseau 



THIS theme will be developed for 
the San Diego Men's Garden 
Club sponsored by the Mission 
Valley Center Flower Show, which 
will be held May 25, 26 and 27, and 
then will be entered as an educational 
theme at the San Diego County Fair 
in June. 

Approximately 120 specimen plants, 
each representing a different country 
or geographical area of origin, will be 
used in the display. Since San Diego 
gardeners landscape their homes for 
aesthetic effect without regard for the 
geographic origin of the plants, the 
display will be carried out in like man- 
ner. European, African, South Amer- 
ican, Asiatic, and Australian countries 
might be represented in a single group- 
ing. Each specimen will be tagged 
with its country or area of origin and 
the botanical names of the specimen 
plants. 

The "CROSSROADS" theme orig- 
inated in an experimental survey of the 
specimen plants in my own collection. 
I used the A, B, and C parts of the 
index of EXOTICA 3 for the sam- 
pling survey, to see how many coun- 
tries would be represented. Forty 
countries were counted. The "CROSS- 
ROADS" exhibit will carry on through 
the rest of the alphabet. A list of bo- 
tanical names, common names if any, 
and areas of origin is included. In 
addition to the list, bromeliads, se- 
lected as to condition at the time of 
the show, and approximately twenty 
genera of succulent forms will be 
included. 

The purpose of this display is to 
bring to the viewing public our city's 
need for a Garden Center, equal in 
size, scope and professional stature to 
the San Diego Zoo. 

One of the reasons why we have the 
greatest zoo in the world, besides the 



uncompromising professional stand- 
ards of the staff, is our climate. Hu- 
mans find our climate most comfort- 
able and healthful. So do the animals 
in our zoo. Try to imagine a climate 
cool enough for polar bears and warm 
enough for alligators. San Diego comes 
closer to that climate ideal than any 
other large city. And the climate that 
humans and animals find so comfort- 
able and healthful permits an almost 
unlimited variety of plants to be used 
in landscaping our homes. 

I present the "CROSSROADS" ex- 
hibit as a "Small sampling of your 
Garden Center in Balboa Park." When 
I'm asked just where this Garden Cen- 
ter is, I'll confess that unfortunately it 
now exists only on paper, and in the 
hopes and dreams of San Diego gar- 
deners, and that we need every inter- 
ested person's help to bring San Diego 



Garden Center into reality. 

I will speak of the need for the Gar- 
den Center as a most important educa- 
tional facility, and how the Garden 
Center, situated in the "Gardening 
Crossroads of the World," will be- 
come a tourist attraction equal to the 
San Diego Zoo. Indeed, it could very 
well become the Mecca of gardeners 
in all parts of the world. I will solicit 
San Diego Botanical Garden Founda- 
tion membership from those who show 
interest in the display, and I will be 
saying over and over again, "The big- 
gest and best Garden Center in the 
world begins right here, with you and 
me." 

Following is a list of the specimen 
plants to be used in the "CROSS- 
ROADS" exhibit, their common 
names, if any, and the countries of 
origin: 



Latin Name 



Common Name 



Country of 
Origin 



Abelia Grandiflora 

Aspidistra Elatior 

Azalea 

Bambusa Multiplex 

Cotoneaster Apiculata 

Acacia Baileyana 

Brassaia Actinophylla 

Cordyline Stricta 
Acalypha Godsefjiana 
Acanthostachys Strobilaceae 
Acanthus Mollis 
Carissa Acokantheva 
Adromiscus Cooperi 
Agapanthus Africanus 
Aloe Arborescens 
Brunsvigia Rosea 
Carpobrotus Edul/s 
Aeonium Avboreuni 
Aeonium Caespitoseum 
Canariense 



Castiron plant 

Golden Goddess Bamboo 
Cotoneaster 
Bailey's Acacia 
Schefflera 



Acalypha 
Acanthus 



Blue Lily of the Nile 
Tree Aloe 

Belladonna Amaryllis 
Hottentot Fig 
Tree Hen-and-Chickens 

Giant Velvet Rose 



China 

China 

China 

China 

China 

Australia 

Australia, New 

Zealand 
Australia 
New Guinea 
Paraguay 
Greece 

Central Africa 
South Africa 
South Africa 
South Africa 
South Africa 
South Africa 
Morocco 
Canary Islands 
Canary Islands 



14 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Latin Name 



Common Name 



Country of 
Origin 



Aeonium Haworthii 
Lindleyi 

Pseudotablajorme 
Tablaeforme 
Urbicum 
Agave Attenuata 
Decipiens 
Aglaonema 
Alocasia Odora 
Colocasia Esculentum 
Amaranthus Tricolor 
Araucaria Excels a 
Arbutus 

Arisaema Tortuosum 
Asparagus Myrtifolius 

Falcatus 
Asparagus Meyeri 

Myriocladus 
Plumosus 
Scandens Deflexus 
Sprengeri 
Ctenanthe Lubbersiana 
Aucuba 

Cocculus Laurifolius 
Bauhina Purpurea 
Cymbidium 
Bougainville a 

Buxus Microphyllia faponica 
Caladium 
Camellia 
Cissus Antarctica 
Cissus Rhombijolia 
Ceropegia 

Crassula Arborescens 
Falcata 
Tetragona 
Chlorophytum Comosum var. 
Clivia Miniata 
Cyperus Papyrus 
Coprosma Baueri 
Cyas Revoluta 
Dizygotheca Elegantissima 
Dudley a Attenuata 
Pulverenta 
Ensete Maurelli 
Fatsia Japonica 
Eatshedera Lizei 
Ficus Benjamina 
Carica 
Elastica 

Lyrata (pandurata) 
Ficus Mysorensis 

Retusa Nitida 
Roxburghii 
Ginkgo Biloba 
Graptopetalum Paraguay en se 
Heimerliodendron Brunoianum 

Helianthus Annuus 
Hibiscus Syriacus 
Homalocladium Platycladum 
Hoya Carnosa Varigata 
Hyacinth us On en talis 
Convolvulus Maurit aniens 
Iresine Herbstii 



Silver Century Plant 

Chinese Evergreen 
Elephant Ear - Taro 
Elephant Ear - Taro 
Joseph's Coat 
Star Pine 

Cobra Lily 
Smilax 



Asparagus Fern 



Bamburanta 
Gold Dust Plant 

Orchid Tree 



Japanese Boxwood 



Kangaroo Vine 
Grape Ivy 



Jade Plant 
Miniature Pine 
Spider Plant 
Kafir Lily 
Lion's Tail 
Mirror Plant 
Japanese Sago Palm 
Aralia Elegantissima 



Abyssinian Banana 
Japanese Aralia 
Climbing Aralia 
Weeping Chinese Banyan 
Fig Tree 

House Rubber Tree 
Fiddle Leaf Fig 

Indian Laurel 

Ginkgo Tree 
Mother-of-Pearl Plant 
Varigatum — 

Para-para Tree 
Common Sunflower 
Rose of Sharon 
Ribbon Plant 

Hyacinth 

Bush Morning Glory 

Blood Leaf 



Tenerife 

Canary Islands 

Tenerife 

Tenerife 

Tenerife 

Mexico 

Yucatan 

Philippines 

Formosa 

Hawaii - Fiji 

East Indies 

Norfolk Island 

The Bible Lands 

India 

South Africa 

Ceylon 

South Africa 

South Africa 

South Africa 

South Africa 

West Africa 

Brazil 

Himalayas 

Himalayas 

Burma 

Himalayas-Burma 

Brazil-Peru 

Japan 

Trinidad 

Korea 

Australia 

West Indies 

Mozambique 

Natal 

Cape Province 

Cape Province 

Central Africa 

Natal 

Egypt 

New Zealand 

Java-Japan 

New Hebrides 

San Diego 

San Diego 

Ethiopia 

Japan 

Ireland-Japan 

Malaya 

The Bible Lands 

Indonesia 

Trop. W. Africa 

Burma-India 

Malaya 

India 

China 

Mexico 

New Zealand 

Missouri 

Syria 

Solomon Islands 

Australia-China 

The Bible Lands 

Sicily 

So. Brazil 



FRIEND OR FOE fcom page 13 
usually Ladybugs. Therefore, Mantis 
and Ladybugs go well together. Should 
the Mantis pick up a Ladybug the 
Ladybug makes known her displeas- 
ure by emitting an odorous fluid. Of 
course, if the Mantis is extremely 
hungry it will eat anything, other 
than vegetation, even to the point 
where a large female sometimes eats 
a smaller male Mantis — however, this 



is rare. 



Mantis are the only insects capable 
of turning their heads from side to 
side. They will not sting or bite and 
can become pets, eating meat or in- 
sects from your fingers. They are poor 
at flying and slow at walking. With 
plenty to eat the Chinese Mantis will 
sometimes grow to the enormous size 
of five inches. In size and appetite, 
the Chinese Mantis is a giant com- 
pared to our small native Mantis. If 
there is adequate food and the Mantes 
generally like the vicinity they will 
remain close to the area where they 
were born. 

The hatching period for the Chinese 
Praying Mantis is in the spring 
months; as late as June in the north- 
ern United States and as early as Feb- 
ruary in the warmer southern states. 
The eggs hatch when the weather 
becomes warm enough and insect food 
becomes available. Cold weather or 
cold nights may affect the hatching, 
but sun, warmth, and rain encour- 
ages the process. The baby Mantes 
emerge from their egg cases and drop 
to the ground as a living chain. In 
this form they resemble a large mos- 
quito and blend in easily with plant 
life. 

When left to themselves, the pro- 
cess of saving crops or gardens is as 
a rule too slow to thwart damage, 
but by giving the Praying Mantis and 
the Ladybug help, control can be 
achieved in relatively brief time. This 
is where our insect distribution com- 
panies, who collect and breed these 
insects for commercial use, can assist 
us. Companies such as the California 
Bug Co. of Auburn, California ship 
hundreds of gallons of these crop- 
saving insects every year to all parts 
of the country. They are shipped by 
parcel post, air mail, or Railway Ex- 
press depending upon the size of the 
order and the immediacy of the need. 
They may be obtained in as small a 
quantity as l / 2 pint to as large a quan- 
tity as gallons. 

There is no need to feel concern 
that our gardens are going to the 
bugs — as long as those bugs are the 
Ladybug and the Praying Mantis ! 



APRIL - MAY, 1967 



15 



Latin Name 



Common Name 



Country of 
Origin 



Jacaranda Acutifolia Jacaranda 

Kalanchoe Varieties 

Laurus Nob His 

Lotus Bertboldi 

Lonicera Aurea Reticulata 

Meryta Sinclairii 

Metasequoia Glyptostroboides 

Monstera Deliciosa 

Myoporum Carsonii 

Myrtis Communis 

Nerium Oleander 

Nothopanax Davidii 

Olea Europea Olive Tree 

Ornithogalum Caudatum Sea Onion 

Phoenix Reclinata 

Phyllostachys Aurea 

Nigra 



Sweet Bay 
Red Lotus 

Varigated Honeysuckle 
Maori "Puka Tree" 
"Dawn Redwood" 
Mexican Breadfruit 

Myrtle Bush 
Oleander 



Pittosporum Tobira 
Plectanthrus Austral is 
Podocarpus Macrophylla 
Portulacaria Afra 
Scinapsis Aureus 
Scilla Violaceae 
Punica Granata 
Rhoeo Spathaceae 
Ruta Graveolens 
Sansevieria Trijasciata 
Setcresea Purpurea 
Solanum Aviculare 
Stapelia Gigantea 
Stephanotis Floribunda 
Strelitzia Nicolai 

Synadenium Grantii 

Grantii Rubra 
Tecomaria Capensis 
Temstroemia Japonica 



Golden Bamboo 
(Running) 

Black Bamboo 
(Running) 



Elephant Bush 
Pothos 

Pomegranate 
Moses in the Cradle 
Common Rue 
Snake Plant 
Purple Wandering Jew 
Kangaroo Apple 
Giant Carrion Flower 
Madagascar Jasmine 
Giant White Bird 

of Paradise 
Chartreuse Euphorbia 
Rubyleaf Euphorbia 
Cape Honeysuckle 



Brazil 

Malagasy Republic 

The Bible Lands 

Canary Islands 

Japan 

New Zealand 

China 

Guatemala, Mexico 

California 

The Bible Lands 

The Bible Lands 

China 

The Bible Lands 

South Africa 

Senegal 

China 

South China 

China-Japan 

Australia 

China-Japan 

South Africa 

Solomon Islands 

South Africa 

The Bible Lands 

Mexico 

The Bible Lands 

South Africa 

Mexico 

Australia 

Rhodesia 

Malagasy Republic 

South Africa 

Tanganyika 

Tanganyika 

Africa 

Japan to India 



GARDENER HONORED ON 
100TH DIRTHDAY 

TV cameras will roll and newsmen 
will take pictures and notes on April 
1, 1967 when the 100th birthday of 
Mrs. Jennie A. Means will be cele- 
brated with a big cake and a big party 
at the Floral Association Building. 

Hosts will be the San Diego Cactus 
& Succulent Society, of which she was 
a Charter member, and is still an active 
member. She is also a member of 
the Palomar Cactus & Succulent So- 
ciety. 

She does all of her own gardening, 
and if you want to know how cactus 
and succulents should be grown, just 
take a look at her garden at 4289 
Landis St. 

Garden friends are invited to visit 
the Floral Building to congratulate 
Mrs. Means, by Dr. Reuben V. 
Vaughn, President of the San Diego 
Cactus & Succulent Society. 



GROW A MDSA BALBISIANA 
DANANA TREE! 

If you have a hankering to grow a 
huge non-fruiting banana tree, just 
call the editor, and ask for a seed, or 
maybe two, and promise that you'll 
plant and tend it. 

The United Fruit Co. sent 10 seeds 
of Musa balbisiana ornamental banana 
which can grow to 23 feet, or 12 feet 
in cooler spots, if it is grown in pots 
and transplanted to larger ones as 
needed. The company says that in hot- 
houses, it will bear small hands of 
bananas which are edible but which 
contain many large seeds. 



SHARING - 

OF- 

THE- 

GREEN 

DAY 



A "Sharing-of-the-Green" Day, 
sponsored by the Garden Section of 
the Santee Womans' Club, is worth 
copying by other garden clubs, espec- 
ially those in out-lying areas whose 
members have larger growing spaces. 

Cuttings, slips, seeds, bulbs and root 
divisions and even plants, were 
brought in by those who had plant 
materials to share. These were placed 
on tables and booths set up by the club 
on the Mayfair Market Parking Lot 
on Saturday, March 4, from 9 to 3 
p.m. 

Those who wished to acquire new 
materials, or who were starting new 
gardens and landscaping projects, 
could ask for these "starts." With a 
promise on their part to care for the 
"greens" given to their care, the recip- 
ients became the proud possessors of 
a garden to be. Possibly right here a 
new group of green thumb gardeners 
came into being, and certainly some 
new gardening friendships were 
formed. 

The California Department of For- 
estry donated liquidambar saplings to 
some who were fortunate to have a 
place for them and who promised 
them care. The green of this tree 
turns to scarlet and gold after cool or 
cold nights in autumn. 

"Sharing-of-the-Green" Day is just 
a part of the Santee Woman's Club 
drive to "make Santee a pleasanter 
place to live through planting and 
gardening." We can already hear the 
visitors to San Diego's 200th anni- 
versary celebration saying; We think 
all of San Diego County is beautiful 
but I think I'd like to live in that 
beautiful green, wholesome-looking, 
home-loving Santee that we drove 
through." 



Patronize The Advertisers 
Who Keep California Garden Growing 



16 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



'SWAN HILL ' 



A New Ornamental Fruitless Olive 



J^\j <-J~Ludson <J . <-J~~Lartvncinn 



THE OLIVE TREE (Olea europ- 
aea L.) has very desirable char- 
acteristics for use as an ornamen- 
tal. It has attractive, gray-green foli- 
age, and develops a picturesque, 
gnarled trunk and branch system as the 
tree grows older. It is an evergreen 
with a willowy-type of shoot growth 
which makes a very pleasing appear- 
ance. 

The great disadvantage of the olive 
as a street, lawn, or patio tree is the 
production of fruits which drop over 
a long period of time during the win- 
ter and early spring months. These, 
of course, become a great nuisance, dis- 
coloring concrete walks, adhering to 
pedestrians' shoes, and attracting birds 
which consume some of the olives and 
further contribute to the litter. 

Aware of the potential value of a 
fruitless olive as an ornamental, horti- 
culturists of the University of Cali- 
fornia have long been on the lookout 
for an olive tree which does not pro- 
duce fruits. Occasionally, it appeared 
that one had been located, but invar- 
iably it originated in an area having 
warm winters and, when grown in 
regions having greater amounts of win- 
ter chilling, such trees would fruit. It 
is known from the climatic adaptation 
of olives that the tree requires a 
period of several months with substan- 
tial chilling temperatures (about 2000 
hours below 45°F) for flower and 
fruit production. Trees grown in reg- 
ions having little or no such chilling 
produce few blooms or fruit because 
they have received insufficient winter 
chilling. 
Australian tree 

During a sabbatic leave, in Austra- 
lia in 1960-61, the author discussed 
the desirability of a fruitless olive tree 
with horticultural officers of the Vic- 
toria Department of Agriculture. They 
mentioned the existence of a single 
olive tree which had been planted ap- 
proximately 30 years previously near 
a farm house close to the town of 
Swan Hill in Northern Victoria. This 



tree had never been known to produce 
fruits. Other olive trees of the same 
age planted around the farmhouse 
fruited normally. This place was visit- 
ed in November, I960, just at the time 
the olive trees were coming into full 
bloom. The "fruitless" tree was in 
bloom, but examination proved that 
the flowers were all staminate, or male. 
There were no perfect flowers (having 
both male and female parts) which, 
in the olive, are necessary if fruits 
are to be produced. The trees around 
the farmhouse had been planted as 
seedlings and apparently the "fruit- 
less" tree carried, as a genetic charac- 
teristic, the failure of the pistil (fe- 
male part of the flower) to develop 
normally, thus resulting essentially in 
a "male" tree. 

Scion wood was collected from this 
tree and shipped airmail to California 
to the USDA Bureau of Entomology 
and Plant Quarantine in San Francisco 
where it was fumigated with methyl 
bromide to destroy any possible insect 
pests. Following this, the scion wood 
was delivered to the Department of 
Pomology at Davis where it was 
grafted onto two young Mission olive 
trees, started from cuttings, and grow- 
ing in 8-gallon containers. A year 
later (1962) one of the trees was 
planted at the University's Wolfskill 
Experimental Orchard at Winters 
while the other was maintained in the 
container at Davis. Holding olive trees 
in containers, where the roots are con- 
fined, will usually cause them to begin 
fruiting earlier than trees set out in 
the orchard. 

While these trees bloomed at both 
Winters and Davis in 1964, 1965, and 
1966, not a single bloom has set fruit, 
all flowers being the staminate type. 
In these areas, ample winter chilling 
occurs to cause olive trees of commer- 
cial varieties to produce fruit. 

The foliage characteristics of this 
"fruitless" olive are the same as those 
of the commercial olive varieties 
grown in California, exhibiting the 



desirable gray coloration on the un- 
derside of the leaves. The young 
stems are somewhat angular in shape 
rather than round as in the usual com- 
mercial varieties. 

Little is known at present of the 
relative susceptibility of this clone to 
the several olive diseases and insect 
pests which occur in California. Leaves 
have been found on the trees, however, 
showing infection with the fungus 
disease, peacock spot, Cycloconium 
oleaginum , which is widespread on 
olives in California, especially follow- 
ing wet winters. This is easily con- 
trolled, however, by spraying with Bor- 
deaux mixture or lime sulfur, applied 
in advance of the winter rains. 

Leafy cuttings of this "fruitless" 
olive obtained in midsummer, treated 
with indolebutyric acid, and placed in 
a rooting medium of vermiculite and 
perlite under intermittent mist sprays 
in the greenhouse failed to root. No 
cuttings rooted out of two separate 
trials with 200 cuttings each, although 
they did callus well and maintained 
good leaf retention. 

Since the cuttings apparently are ex- 
ceptionally difficult to root, propaga- 
tion by budding or grafting onto root- 
stock plants will be necessary. Scions 
of this "fruitless" olive have been 
grafted on one- to three-year-old 
trees of other varieties, started as 
rooted cuttings, without difficulty. A 
side-tongue grafting method was used 
in which the top of the rootstock was 
not cut back to the inserted scion un- 
til the graft union had healed and the 
scion buds resumed growth. 

Grafting wood of this ornamental 
fruitless olive will be distributed in 
small quantities for propagating pur- 
poses to nurseries through the Founda- 
tion Plant Materials Service, Depart- 
ment of Viticulture and Enology, Uni- 
versity of California, Davis, starting in 
the summer of 1968. 

The name proposed for this fruitless 
olive is 'Swan Hill,' after the town 
in Australia where it was found. 



APRIL - MAY, 1967 



17 



A Book In The Hand 



by Alice Mary Greer 



Wedding Flowers, Decoration and Eti- 
quette: Virginia Clark. Hearthside 
Press, 1966, 159 pages: $6.95. 

This book is designed to help plan 
a perfect wedding, large or small, 
simple or elaborate and, in so doing, 
to answer questions of protocol that 
may arise. Here is truly an exhaus- 
tive and unique discussion of the mul- 
titudinous facets of a wedding. 

Arranging the flowers in the home 
for a simple ceremony is shown in 
easy-to-follow pictures, charts and di- 
rections. Every step of the procedure 
is told; — cutting garden materials, 
conditioning it and making it into 
lovely designs. Bridal consultants and 
florists will find the book extremely 
helpful for its many design ideas and 
its complete coverage of questions in 
servicing a wedding. Virginia Clark 
has done a remarkable and a thorough 
job. There are 85 drawings and 9 
color plates. 

The 12 chapters cover the whole 
field; planning the wedding; an- 
nouncements and pre -wedding parties; 
wedding protocol; members of the 
wedding; the wedding ceremony, in- 
cluding the rehearsal; practical advice 
on flowers, foliage and designs; floral 
decorations for the church; floral dec- 
orations for the home; hotel and gar- 
den weddings; making corsages and 
boutonnieres; making bouquets for the 
bridal party; flower girls and ring 
bearers; decorations for reception 
tables. 

The author has had a wide back- 
ground in interior decorating. She 
studied at the University of Colorado, 
her native state. She has written for 
various trade magazines and has served 



as a designer at schools sponsored by 
Florists' Telegraph Delivery. At pres- 
ent her activities as lecturer on design, 
and as a judge are centered in Boone, 
Iowa where she and her son own "Vir- 
ginia's House of Flowers." 

New Trends in Flower Arrangement, 
by Rae L. Goldson, Hearthside Press, 
1966, Hard cover, 117 pages, $4.95. 

HERE is the second book pub- 
lished by this author, arranger 
and lecturer from Florida who 
puts in a book of handbook size a 
tremendous amount of information 
that would be helpful to a lecturer or 
arranger. Her working materials, 
familiar to us here in California, are- 
used over and over to demonstrate this 
"New Trend" as she sees it. 

As so often happens in books on 
this subject the text is superior to the 
illustrations which no doubt would 
have been more exciting in color. The 
language used is understandable and 
presented in good progression through 
Op Art, Pop Art, Abstract, Assem- 
blages, Mobiles and Stabiles. The au- 
thor frequently refers to artists and 
sculptors such as Picasso, Calder, Bra- 
que, etc., to make a point and convey 
to the arranger the great need to be 
creative. 

If you are interested in "Less is 
More," "Form Follows Function," 
"Junk Art," contrived containers and 
"found" objects then this book is for 
you. 

However, it is all summed up with 
the same old admonition — "The 
eternal verities of art are still scale, 
proportion, balance, rhythm, unity' 
contrast, color and texture" with 



originality and craftsmanship going 
hand in hand in this "New Trend" to 
who knows where. 

By Vera Terrell, Flower Arrangers' 
Guild of San Diego. 

The Wild Flowers of California: Mary 
Elizabeth Parson; Dover Publications; 
1966; paper bound; 425 pages; $2.25. 

HERE is an old friend in a bright 
new paper dress. Among the 
earliest of the popular floras, 
(first published seventy years ago) 
still one of the most useful to the 
wildflower lover who sees a plant 
new to him and wants to know what 
to call it. Now it is brought up 
to date by a table of changes in nom- 
enclature prepared by Roxanne S. 
Farris of Stanford University. This 
contains everything needed to make 
use of the material included: glossary, 
English and Latin indices, a lucid ex- 
planation of terms, brief descriptions 
of families as well as largest and most 
important genera; — a key that is easy 
as keys go. 

Some 600 of California's most com- 
mon or most conspicuous flowering 
plants are arranged according to color 
of the flowers. While this is not a 
scientific approach it is the easiest 
place for the amateur to start, and 
probably the most fun. Granted, you 
can get into "It's pink — no-o — it's 
purple" conversations with yourself, 
but at least you won't be looking in 
the yellow section for your specimen. 
The 250 illustrations, from pen-and- 
ink drawings, are a delight to the eye. 
If you happen to be looking at one 
of the plants illustrated, your identi- 
fication will be quick, easy, and un- 
erring. 

If your plant is not illustrated, read 
the descriptions, which you will find 
accurate, sufficiently detailed to an- 
swer your questions, and easily fol- 
lowed through as soon as you get 
used to reading "lines" as twelfths 
of an inch. Data is given on stems, 
leaves, details of flowers and fruits, 
size and habitat. 

Additional information of general 
nature follows, including those inter- 
esting little items we lump under the 
term "lore:" early uses by Indians 
and pioneers; how the plant got its 
common, or botanical, name; relation- 
ship to garden plants. Good pick-up 
book — where else would you ever 
learn that "Shooting Stars" have been 
variously called "Mad Violets," "Prai- 
rie Pointers," "Mosquito Bills," and 
"Roosters' Heads?" 

By Helen Witham, Wildflower 
Chairman, San Diego Botanical Gar- 
den Foundation. 



18 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



San Diego 
Botanical 
Garden 
Foundation, 



nc 




by Penny Bunker 



WITH gardeners, there is al- 
ways something interesting to 
do. Springtime is the busiest 
time of the year as we are occupied 
with planning for shows, finishing our 
garden chores, and developing new 
ideas — so it is with the San Diego 
Botanical-Garden Foundation. Its trus- 
tees and board of councilors are work- 
ing diligently toward one goal; A 
Garden Center. 

The Foundation sponsors monthly 
horticultural classes held the last 
Thursday of each month in the Floral 
Building. On January 29, 1967, Dr. 
Samuel Ayres, Jr. of La Canada, spoke 
before a meeting jointly sponsored by 
the San Diego Botanical-Garden Foun- 
dation, Inc., and the Floral Committee 
of San Diego 200th Anniversary, Inc. 
Dr. Ayres is the Chairman of Horti- 
culture for Los Angeles Beautiful 
Committee. He is keenly interested 
in Flowering Trees, Shrubs, and Vines. 
As a result of multiple correspond- 
ences, he donated a rare flowering 
Brazilian tree, Chorisa speciosa, to the 
City of San Diego for its 200th Anni- 
versary. It was accepted and planted 
by the Botanical-Garden Foundation. 
A tree planting ceremony was held 
on Arbor Day, March 7, 1967, near 
the n?w Otto Educational Building of 
the San Diego Zoo. Mr. Walter 
Andersen represented the trustees of 
the Foundation. Assisting him was 
Mrs. William (Joan) Betts, Jr., Chair- 
man of the Floral Committee of the 
200th Anniversary, Inc. and Mrs. 
Walter E. (Penny) Bunker, represent- 
ing the Councilors of the Foundation. 
Accepting the tree on behalf of the 
Zoo was Mr. Charles Shaw, Assistant 
Director. 

Also, as a result of Councilman 
Allen Hitch attending this meeting, he 
has asked the City Council to consult 



with Dr. Ayres concerning flowering 
trees for San Diego, and in particular 
the landscaping of the new Stadium 
area. 

Even in its infancy, the Botanical- 
Garden Foundation is contributing to 
its city. 

February and March classes were 
held with instructions for the growing 
of Fuchsias and Orchids. Attendance 
was noted by its wide-spread repre- 
sentation; interested folk coming from 
as far as North County to Spring 
Valley on the South. 

March 31st marked another Preview 
Night preceding the Orchid Show of 
April 1 and 2. Councilwoman Helen 
Cobb cut the ribbon opening "Orchids 
on Parade" — part of the proceeds to 
be donated to the Foundation Fund. 

Garden Center interest has been in- 
tensified by the news that the 200th 
Anniversary Committee has raised the 
possibility that the Spanish Govern- 
ment might build a pavilion for their 
use during 1969 and for the Botanical- 
Garden Foundation to manage for the 
benefit of the Garden and Floral or- 
ganizations thereafter. Representatives 
of the 200th Anniversary Committee 
and the City are contacting the Spanish 
Ambassador toward having the Span- 
ish Government build in the Prado 
Area, Balboa Park, — possibly on the 
Garden Center site. 

An invitation is extended for all to 
join the San Diego Botanical-Garden 
Foundation. Let's all join forces for a 
truly CITY BEAUTIFUL. 




Meeting of Councilors: 

April 7, 1967 
7:30 p.m., Floral Bldg., Balboa Park 

April Horticultural Class: 
Subject - "Iris" 
April 27, 1967, 7:30 p.m. 
Floral Building, Balboa Park 



EXQUISITE 

BLOOMING PLANTS AT 

GARDEN CENTER 
454-424 1 

7555 EADS AVENUE • LA JOLLA 



ART ENTERPRISES 

by Pharis 

I ANNOUNCES 

I SUMMER CLASSES 

Local Arts & Crafts 
Distinctive Decorations 

Enroll Now for 

New Summer Classes in: 

Color Design, Stitchery 
Modern Floral 
Arrangement 
Decoupage and other 
popular crafts 



Make reservation early 

WE SPECIALIZE IN ALL ACCES- 
SORIES FOR ARTS AND CRAFTS. 

Call 295-5837 

1578 West Lewis (Mission Hills) 
San Diego 92103 



APRIL -MAY, 1967 



19 



Calendar of Care 



Uewn'to*Ga>itk (ja^bemna lot ClpUl & Ulau 




b\j Uick Hull, Plantsvnan 



FEW GARDENERS will complain 
about the weather these days. 
Warm temperatures have pushed 
out fresh, lush growth almost every- 
where one looks. Frost is a thing of 
the past now, here in the Southwest, 
except in a few mountain areas. For 
gardeners the months ahead are the 
pleasant productive ones. 

For those of us who like garden 
color with annuals this summer, now 
is the time to plant them. You'll find 
balsam, sweet alyssum, red salvia, pe- 
tunia, marigold, cosmos, plume celosia, 
dwarf dahlia, zinnia and portulaca in 
most nurseries. Some plants can be 
started from seed where they are to be 
grown. These include annual chrysan- 
themums, nasturtiums, scabiosa and 
castor beans. A word of warning on 
the latter; While the foliage is lush 
and tropical, from bronze green to red, 
the plants and beans are dangerously 
poison. 

In the vegetable garden, seeds or 
plants of cucumbers, beets, corn, beans, 
eggplant, melons, okra, tomatoes, 
squash, peppers and onions can also 
be set out now. These will bring on 
to the table the best of flavor and 



great satisfaction when home-grown. 
Don't neglect the importance of 
thorough soil preparation several 
weeks before you are planting. This 
is in itself as important for good re- 
sults as the quality of seeds or plants 
one uses. 

In southern California and in the 
low desert regions, the mild winter 
is bringing pests in great hordes. Aphis 
is generally the number one pest now 
in all areas of the southland. You 
can use a spray mixture of either of 
the following to rid plants of the 
pests; Malathion, Lindane or Nicotine 
sulphate at the strength recommended 
on the bottle. You can also hose them 
off the plant with a strong watering, 
but this only redistributes the aphis; 
— it does not kill them. Besides 
there are new generations hatching out 
all the time. For thrips, use Mala- 
thion, Lindane or one of the new 
systemics exactly as directed. A pest 
that plagues ornamentals and citrus 
is the red spider mite. Malathion, 
applied at two-week intervals, can re- 
duce the infestation. In addition to 
spraying the plants, keep weeds under 
control and keep all plant waste ma- 



terial cleaned up not only for garden 
beauty but to reduce pests. 

Citrus and avocados can now be 
planted, — the sooner the better for 
the plant. If space is limited, you 
might check on the dwarf varieties of 
citrus. These will attain a height of 
only 8 feet when fully mature. All 
citrus will need more frequent water- 
ings as the weather warms. Feed with 
a complete fertilizer this month. For 
those who plan to, or are already 
growing dwarf citrus, it is a good 
idea to give them light feedings at 
frequent intervals due to the root con- 
tainment. Citrus likes a sunny area, 
free from winds and some distance 
from the lawns. Be sure that the 
soil drainage is good before you 
plant. 

The Avocado Persea americana is 
confined to the warmest and most 
frost-free areas. These small evergreen 
trees belong to the Laurel family 
Lauraceae. The name is an old Greek 
one attributed to Theophrastus for 
an Egyptian tree and later used in its 
present sense. The soil requirements 
for avocados are not exacting. It 
flourishes in sandy and limestone soils 



20 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



that drain readily. Drainage, it must 
have. The trees will not prosper if 
the soil is wet or water-logged. They 
are even sensitive to water remaining 
over the root area for as little as two 
days. In exposed places, the tree 
should be sheltered from strong winds 
by protection of some kind. The dis- 
tance between trees, (if there is room 
for more than one) will depend upon 
the variety. A wider spacing should 
be allowed on rich soils; — a distance 
of 25 to 35 feet between trees is about 
right. If possible, two trees are better 
for insuring fruit setting. Although 
the flowers contain both functioning 
male and female elements, they are 
not ordinarily self -pollinating because 
the stigma (female part) of each 
flower matures before the stamens 
(male organs) of the same flower 
produce their pollen. The stigma 
ceases to be receptive before the pol- 
len is ripe. Planting different varie- 
ties that pollinate each other satisfac- 
torily will also extend the season of 
production of the crop. 

Newly-set-out trees should be kept 
well watered and should be shaded at 
first against strong sunshine. Avocados 
are heavy feeders and respond to gen- 
erous fertilization either organic or 
chemical forms. Care should be taken 
that excessive use of nitrogenous fer- 
tilizer does not result in too much 
vegetative growth at the expense of 
fruit production. 

Trimming back of any frost-dam- 
aged sub-tropicals and flowering shrubs 
can be accomplished now. Prune back 
to where vigorous new growth is start- 
ing. Thin out old and excessive canes 
to encourage young growth on nan- 
dina, mahonia and bamboo. Cut mel- 
ianthus major back hard after they 
have bloomed and are starting to look 
shabby. On wisteria, remove the long 
green winding tendril-like stems that 
develop after the vine has finished 
blooming. If your vine bloomed 
sparsely this spring, you might en- 
courage more flower production by 
cutting off the ends of some of the 
roots by sliding your shovel around 
one side of the root area about 2 or 
3 feet from the trunk. 

Gardening is a lot of fun and a 
challenge to all to obtain the best 
results. It has been a pleasure shar- 
ing and talking gardening over the 
past year with all of you. Due to other 
commitments, I find that it would not 
be possible to do justice to both the 
writing and the work I have cut out 
for myself. So with a happy thought 
of good gardening to all of you; — 
until we meet again. 



SHORELINE NURSERY 

Top quality, variety and large stock of 

TREES. FLOWERING SHRUBS. PERENNIALS 
AND BEDDING PLANTS 



In Business with new stock, at present 
location until about June 1, 1967 

NEW LOCAT50N (After June 1 ) 

Interstate 5 

at Palomar Airport Road Interchange. 




MAINTENANCE SERVICE 



955 First St. (Hwy. 101) Encinitas 



Phone 753-1196 



CURTIS COLEMAN CO. REALTORS 

SINCE 1913 

SALES LEASES REAL ESTATE LOANS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Suite 2100, United States National Bank Bldg. 
Centre City, San Diego 1, Calif. 233-6557 




an. eUfani 

With HAZARD BLOC - : 
"i HAZARD BRIC & . 
DECOR ROC 

HAZARD PRODUCTS 



JVHSSION VALEEY 

riJfe Hd, & Highway 395 _ 

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in EL CftJON 

288 Fletcher ?<*£kway; 

444-3124 



APRIL -MAY, 1967 



21 



RAINFORD 



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ower 



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Flowers for all Occasions 
3334 Fifth Ave. 233-7101 



Commercial and Artistic 

PHOTOS 
BY MACKINTOSH 

320 MOSS AVE., CHULA VISTA 

422-4650 



HORTICULTURAL 
BOOKS 

FOR GROWERS 
IN WARM REGIONS 



Send for free list. Special atten- 
tion given to orchids, brome- 
liads, succulents, palms, aroids, 
etc. 



HORTICULTURAL BOOKS, INC. 

Drawer 45 
Stuart, Florida 33494 



Roses 



by J. Wells Hershey and 
Mary Jane Hershey 

San Diego Rose Society 



APRIL showers bring May flow- 
ers they say, but not here, un- 
less they are man-made by the 
placing of the garden hose and the 
turning on of the water faucet! Due 
to a rainless February in San Diego 
County, we had to start our watering 
program sooner than we had antici- 
pated — in February, as rose beds 
should not be allowed to dry out below 
the top two inches of soil. In checking 
your soil, don't be misled if the soil 
under the mulch is damp in the morn- 
ing. Due to the humidity in the air, 
condensation in the mulch will occur 
during the night, so push back the 
mulch and dig down in the soil, two 
to four inches, and see just what is 
going on. Of course, if you have a 
moisture meter all you have to do is 
read it. 

The method of watering is varied, 
but can be grouped into three cate- 
gories; overhead sprinkling, basin 
system, and underground. We com- 
bined the overhead sprinkling with 
the basin system, alternating according 
to the demands on the rose garden 
and of the rose garden. Mrs. Jean 
Kenneally's underground watering 
system article, PUT THE WATER 
WHERE THE ROOTS ARE, (Cali- 
fornia Garden: Aug. /Sept., 1966) 
was of sufficient interest to rosarians 



G. S. JOHNSON ROSE NURSERY 

8606 GRAVES AVENUE, SANTEE, CALIFORNIA 
Corner Graves & Prospect in Santee — On Highway 67 

20 years in same location 

Phone: 448-6972 

ROSE SPECIALISTS 

Bare Root Bush Roses . . . Climbers and trees available January 
through April . . . or . . . plant from cans all year. 

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OPEN 7 DAYS — 8:00 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. 





elsewhere that it was reprinted in the 
American Rose Society's monthly mag- 
azine (American Rose Magazine: Oct. 
1966). 

April also brings the BIG SHOW 
to San Diego, for on April 22 and 
23, 1967, in the Conference Build- 
ing, Balboa Park, the San Diego Rose 
Society will hold its 40th Annual 
Spring Rose Show. The theme "Holi- 
day with Roses" will be evident in 
the Arrangement Section. If you want 
to know how to enter roses in this 
show, come to the April meeting of 
the San Diego Rose Society, April 17, 
1967 at 8:00 p.m. in the San Diego 
Floral Association Building, Balboa 
Park. In the April-May 1964 issue 
of the California Garden is another 
excellent article on roses, GROOM- 
ING ROSES FOR THE SHOW by 
Clive Pillsbury. Don't leave that 
Queen of the Show home, sitting on 
that rose bush; — cut it, groom it and 
bring it to the show! 

April is the month in which you 
must start thinking about insect and 
disease control in your rose bed. What- 
ever method or program you select, 
you must be consistent. If you are 
planning to enter roses in the Spring 
Rose Show, you might try spraying 
once a week, or oftener if necessary, 
using a diluted spray, about one-fifth 
the recommended strength. Good fol- 
iage is one of the secrets of growing 
good roses; because good foliage 
means long stems, big flowers and 
good color in the petals. If the leaves 
are damaged by pest or diseases, the 
rose bushes will show signs of car- 
bohydrate deficiency, and even though 
the rose garden may have adequate 
moisture and food, the stems will be 
short and the flowers small and light 
in color. If you asked five rosarians 
how they controlled insects and dis- 
eases in their rose gardens, they might 
not agree on the manufacturer, or the 
product, but they would agree that 



22 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



control can only be accomplished by 
a regular spray schedule. 

Now is the time to watch for rust 
on the foliage. It appears on the lower 
leaves first, (they are nearer the ground 
where the spores are carried through 
the winter — and the dormant clean- 
up spray might not reach all of them) 
look for little yellow specks on the 
leaves. If you find any, turn the leaf 
over — if there are red spots behind 
the yellow specks remove the leaf at 
once, because this is rust. Remove all 
other leaves with rust on them, and 
check the ground for fallen leaves. 
As you remove these leaves, place them 
in your paper bag. Upon completion 
of this task, place bag in trash can, 
making certain that your hands or 
gloves are clean before handling un- 
infected rose foliage. Rust can de- 
foliate the entire rose garden in a 
short time, and while the foliage will 
grow back, beautiful blooms are lost. 

Mildew is menacing your bushes 
every time we have damp or foggy 
weather, but if you keep your soil on 
the acid side, pH 6.5 and spray regu- 
larly with Acti-Dione you should be 
able to control it. Some roses are 
mildew prone, — we had one, Belle of 
Portugal, which we removed. 

As soon as your roses have an inch 
or two of new growth, they should be 
fed. There are many good fertilizers 
on the market, even a systemic rose 
fertilizer; all have been used with 
varied degrees of success. Combining 
a complete soil fertilizer — y 2 to 1 
cup once a month — with frequent 
foliar application of a good liquid 
fertilizer such as Country Squire Rose 
Food is the procedure followed by 
Dr. Donald A. Wilson, while Mrs. 
Jean Kenneally put the liquid fertili- 
zer where the roots are, using her 
underground watering system. Both 
make certain the soil is moist, not 
dry, before feeding their bushes. The 
new systemic rose fertilizer is granu- 
lar, it lasts for six weeks, was quite 
effective on thrip in our rose garden 
last summer, and as we do not eat 
our roses, we are planning to use it 
this year, along with Country Squire 
Rose Food for foliar feeding. We al- 
ways water our roses before we feed 
them. 

After our first bloom period of 
roses is over, which will be ap- 
proximately the first part of May, we 
will prune our rose garden and will 
give it the second application of fer- 
tilizer. Our second crop of blooms 
should be ready about the third and 
fourth weeks of June, just in time for 
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WHITTIKER'S FURNITURE 




SPANISH 
EARLY AMERICAN 



APRIL -MAY, 1967 



23 



Irises 



by Betty Springer Van Dusen 

San Diego - Imperial Counties Iris Society 



IRIS time is here or near! Begin- 
ning with the advent of the dwarfs 
and Arils in March, and on 
through April and into May with the 
tall bearded varieties, the iris fancier 
lives in a whirl of irises. When you've 
been bitten by the "Iris Bug" you find 
yourself getting up at dawn and rush- 
ing out to see what will unfurl each 
day with perhaps a try at peeling back 
the petals to rush things on a bit. 
This results in torn petals but it is 
almost impossible to resist this urge, 
especially for the first peek at a newly- 
acquired variety. Actually it's even 
difficult to stay indoors at all during 
iris season for bloomstalks of iris 
change from hour to hour, and so it 
goes until at last you must bid them 
goodnight just as it becomes too dark 
to see them anymore, and you long 
for just one more hour of daylight! 
If you are fortunate enough to have 
your irises planted where the last rays 
of the setting sun can shine through 
the petals as though through stained 
glass windows you will have an extra 
special reward for your efforts. 

This is also the time for the iris 
enthusiast to go visiting — the shows, 
other private and public plantings, 
and the commercial gardens where 
visitors are always welcome. Seeing 
as many varieties as possible is the 
best way to choose new additions for 
your collection. Planning your "want 
list" is one of the joys of the season. 
To keep your garden up to date some 
newer varieties should be added each 
year and older, outmoded ones dis- 



carded if space or a change in taste 
necessitates it. The most noticeable 
characteristic when considering a new 
variety is its color, but this is not the 
most important aspect of an iris. No 
matter how lovely the color is, an iris 
is of little worth if it is inclined to 
fade rapidly, wilt in a day, or lose 
its trim shape. Therefore substance 
and form are of the utmost import- 
ance. Most of the newer introductions 
meet these requirements, but a good 
iris need not be a recent and expen- 
sive one if care is used in selection. 
From a lengthy list of older, inexpen- 
sive varieties many are still considered 
fine garden subjects such as Char- 
Maize, Montecito, and Techney 
Chimes among the yellows; White 
Ruffles, Frost & Flame, and Swan 
Ballet, whites; Sierra Skies, Galilee, 
and Sparkling Waters, blues; Happy 
Birthday, Lynn Hall, and Fleeta, 
pinks; Black Taffeta and Violet Hills, 
darks; and one of the very best reds 
to date, Bang. One could go on and 
on naming still other popular "class- 
ics." Newly introduced irises generally 
sell for $25.00 to $30.00 each their 
first year because of the short supply. 
Prices drop each year until it is not 
long before they become readily avail- 
able to all. What are these fabulous 
newer irises like? Are they really 
vastly different from the old "flags" 
of Grandma's day? It shouldn't be 
hard to see for yourself with the num- 
ber of gardens and shows available 
for your observation, so plan on going 
visiting this year. 



May is Bloom+ime at 

Van Dusen Iris Gardens 

Visitors are welcome 

Free Catalog 
Descanso, Calif. 92016 445-3024 



CAROLYN 
BEAUTY SHOP 

CALL 234-5344 

121 W. Juniper— Just off First Ave. Bus 

Convenient Parking 



The two largest iris shows in South- 
ern California, the San Diego-Imper- 
ial Iris Society Show which will 
be held on April 29th and 30th in 
the Conference Building, Balboa Park, 
and the Southern California Iris 
Society Show in Los Angeles on the 
same days, both promise to be spec- 
tacular affairs. Many hundreds of the 
very choicest specimens will be vying 
for your attention and for the coveted 
blue ribbons. Several smaller shows 
are scheduled throughout California 
at about the same time, also. These 
shows all solicit the entries of well- 
grown irises from anyone wishing to 
enter them. Who knows, perhaps you 
are growing a potential "Queen of 
the Show," but no one will ever know 
it if you don't enter it! 

It is essential in an American Iris 
Society Show that each entry be iden- 
tified by its proper name, so this is 
a good reason to keep your plants 
labeled. Irises are judged on the 
overall quality of the stalk at the mo- 
ment of judging. A specimen stalk 
would preferably have three or four 
open blossoms, well balanced on a 
straight stalk. The top flower should 
be open. If the flowers are a little 
larger than usual for the variety, good 
culture is indicated and helps boost 
its chances. Grooming is important, 
too, with no noticeable tears, water 
spots, or faded flowers to mar its per- 
fection. Do plan on entering some 
specimen stalks in a show this year, it 
just might be more rewarding than 
you realize. 

Probably the worst pest to be found 
in the iris garden at bloom time is 
thrip. These minute insects can badly 
scar the petals while the blossom is 
still in the bud stage, causing it to 
open as a deformed flower or one with 
white streaks marring the smooth 
petals. Because of the difficulty in 
reaching these little "critters" with 
ordinary sprays, a systemic spray such 
as Cygon E-2 gives effective and long 
lasting protection. Please read the 
cautions carefully. 

Keeping an iris garden well- 
groomed while the irises are in bloom 
is a pleasant chore. One learns to 
pick off spent blossoms carefully to 
avoid picking a bud hidden beneath 
and to cut off the entire stalk to the 
ground when all of the blossoms on 
a stalk have finished. This latter task 
is perhaps not so cheerful, but plan- 
ning now for the glory of next spring 
with bigger clumps and perhaps some 
new things to look forward to, can 
compensate for the conclusion of' "Iris 
Time." 



24 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Camellias 

by Mrs. William De France 

San Diego Camellia Society 



John tolel 
book # era 



craft shop 



See us at our NEW LOCATION 
780 Prospect, La Jolla 



454-4766 



454-0814 



THE camellia is one of the easiest 
plants to grow if its basic cul- 
tural requirements are provided. 
Its demands are few and simple but 
rather exacting. A study of the plant 
in its natural surroundings establishes 
the fact that its basic requirements, 
studied in the simplest terms, are the 
following: 1. Some protection from 
sun and wind; 2. Perfect drainage; 3. 
Soil that is loose and slightly acid; 4. 
Shallow planting; 5. Watering prop- 
erly; 6. A good feeding program. 

The camellia, in nature, was a 
woodland plant protected from strong 
wind and full sun by tall trees. In the 
absence of trees one should be able 
to find some spot where buildings, 
fences or hedges would provide pro- 
tection from wind and sun. 

It is important that good drainage 
be provided in order to grow camellias 
successfully. Camellias can not stand 
wet feet. If you have to plant in a 
low, poorly-drained soil, it is advis- 
able to plant in raised beds. The soil 
in these beds should consist of equal 
parts of sandy loam soil and firbark. 
The planting hole should be made two 
feet wider than the root ball of the 
plant and to the depth of 18 to 24 
inches. Make sure that the top of the 
root ball extends 2 inches above the 
ground level. Remember: — more 

CAMELLIAS ARE KILLED FROM PLANT- 
ING TOO DEEP THAN FROM ALL OTHER 

causes. Fill the hole around the ball 
with a mixture of sandy loam and 
firbark, then pack and water the soil 
well. 

The most important thing that you 
can do for your camellia, once it is 
planted, is to keep it properly watered. 
A thorough soaking once a week or 
every 10 days is much better than a 
light watering every day or two. 

Start your feeding program in 
March or by the first of April. We 
like to feed with a water soluble 6-10- 
8 formula, fortified with chelated iron 
and zinc, and rich fish concentrate 
that contains no chloride or salts. This 



type of feeding helps to give the plant 
a quick take-off in growth. We also 
spray the foliage well. 

A program of general spraying 
every spring (April or May) and 
again in the fall (September or Octo- 
ber) before the blooming season will 
insure healthy pest-free plants that 
will be your pride. 



CULUGAN 

KEN WALKER 

, Serving La Jolla - Pacific Beach 

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FILTERS 



970 TURQUOISE • PACIFIC BEACH 



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GROWERS OF OVER 300 RARE AND COMMON VARIETIES 

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FRANK FORDYCE ORCHIDS 

We specialize in Orchid Plants for the hobbyist growers. 

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Visitors Welcome 

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use COUNTRY SQUIRE 
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CAMELLIA FOOD 6-10-8 formula, Rich fish concentrate. 
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ROSE FOOD 8-8-8 formula tested and approved by the 

SAN DIEGO ROSE SOCIETY 

Made in San Diego 



APRIL - MAY, 1967 



25 



Dahlias 

by Larry Sisk 

San Diego County Dahlia Society 



IN THE essential battle with in- 
sects which all Southern Califor- 
nia gardeners fight, there are 
three specially important times for 
dahlia growers to be aggressive. 

The first is at the time the dahlia 




Alice and Allan Zukor 

Validated Customer Parking at Rear of Store 

733 Broadway 239-1228 



sprout breaks through the ground and 
starts to leaf out. Next is when the 
buds start showing color. Third is late 
summer after the weather has warmed 
enough to encourage spider mites. 

During the early stages of growth, 
dahlias are susceptible to all of the in- 
sects that other plants attract, but the 
most damage can result if thrips and 
leaf miners get started. Prevention is 
better than cure, and this can be ac- 
complished by use of the correct poi- 
sons: DDT for the thrip and mala- 
thion mixed with light spray oil for 
the leaf miner. 

Instead of using the oil, some dahlia 
growers have had success by using fish 
emulsion with the malathion and 
DDT. The fish oil seems to provide 
just the right film to protect the tender 
leaves and keeps the other poisons on 
the plant to provide protection. This 
mixing of fish emulsion with insecti- 



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P. O. Box 608 



cides also is beneficial by giving the 
plants a good foliar feeding at a time 
when fast growth is desirable. 

Early treatment is recommended be- 
cause thrip damage — deformed leaves 
and stems — and the patterns mined 
in the dahlia leaves are lasting and 
will detract from the quality of blooms 
later on. 

A further protection used by some 
dahlia growers is arsenate of lead: 
a heaping tablespoonful with each five 
to ten gallons of mixture. Gardeners 
with small children and yard pets 
should beware of the arsenate of lead. 

The next crucial time when the buds 
start to show color calls for protec- 
tion against worms and caterpillars. 
Soaking the plants will help prevent 
damage to the blooms as the buds 
open. Malathion, and again with the 
arsenate of lead if desired, is about 
the best of the general purpose insec- 
ticides. Mixing in the fish at this time 
also will provide a spreader as well 
as to give the plants an important 
blooming boost with the fertilizer. 

Because spider mites seem to be im- 
mune to many of the insecticides, and 
because they hide on the under side 
of dahlia leaves, they come out in 
force when the weather stays warm. 
Malathion is supposed to get 'em, and 
like other sure cures, it doesn't always. 

The poison that is effective is kel- 
thane, either straight or in a mixture. 

For best protection of the dahlia 
plants or beds, a regular schedule of 
spraying is best. Two dosings of the 
entire garden area and adjoining trees, 
shrubs and grass plots are recom- 
mended for the off season: once, say 
in early December, and once in early 
spring from mid-March to mid- April. 
By using DDT the gardener will 
thwart the many pests that try to over- 
winter, from growing season to grow- 
ing season. 



26 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



In addition to the three crucial 
sprayings, weekly prevention will keep 
the dahlia plants clean. A similar 
routine will keep other garden plants 
clean, too. And in an aside, good 
gardening techniques practiced by the 
dahlia grower are good techniques to 
be used in any kind of garden ! 

Gardeners have received some im- 
portant help in their battles against 
insects from the introduction of sys- 
temic poisons. The liquids which have 
been used by some for several years 
now have been joined by granular 
poisons that are applied dry to the 
soil, and made available by watering. 
Some dahlia growers are experiment- 
ing with the granular poisons by mix- 
ing them with the soil in the bottom 
of the hole at the time the tuber is 
planted. 

Effectiveness of the liquids against 
aphids and leaf miners has been re- 
ported fairly generally, but some gar- 
deners have reservations about their 
efficiency against some of the cater- 
pillar moths, leaf hoppers and white 
flies which plague dahlia plants. 

The doubting gardener takes his 
own precautions by following a DDT, 
malathion, arsenate-of-lead, kelthane 
routine, in addition to experimenting 
with the systemics. 

As this is the planting season for 
dahlias, planning to protect them is 
important. Growers who plan to ex- 
hibit at the county fair will have just 
about completed their planting by 
mid-April. Those pointing to the big 
dahlia show in Balboa Park the first 
weekend in August will begin plant- 
ing in mid-April and continue for a 
month. 

Dahlias may be planted right on 
until July for late blooms. 

After planting, there should be 
sufficient growth in one month to per- 
mit the plant to be topped; pinch out 
the growing tip to make the plant 
bush out. The large and medium-size 
varieties will bloom about 60 days 
after topping. The real large ones 
will take longer. 

In addition to topping, disbudding 
and disbranching are essential to help 
the large varieties attain maximum 
size. Only one bud should be per- 
mitted to grow on each stem or cane, 
and no more than four or five canes 
should be permitted to grow on plants 
of the large varieties. Medium-size 
flowers are best when the canes are 
restricted to six or eight. 

The smaller varieties may be per- 
mitted to grow as many flowers as they 
are capable. Pinching-out of the cane 
tips in addition to the top will produce 
more and smaller blooms. 



PEOPLE 
WHO KNOW 



Use 



ARAGRO 

10-5-5 

Blended with Deodorized 
Organic Fish Concentrate 

ALL PURPOSE 
LIQUID FERTILIZER 

For LAWNS— DICHONDRA 
SHRUBS— FLOWERS 
VEGETABLES— FRUITS 



FULL BLOOM 
AHEAD 



Use 



ARAGRO 

4-1 0-8 

Blended with Deodorized 
Organic Fish Concentrate 

Specially formulated for 

LARGE FLOWERS 
MORE FRUIT FLAVOR 



■ 



WHEN 

NATURE NEEDS 

A HELPING HAND 

-and She Usually Does 



FEED YOUR 
FUCHSIAS — AZALEAS 
LAWNS — DICHONDRA 
AND AFRICAN VIOLETS 

ARAGRO 

FISH EMULSION 




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Nursery 

LARGEST SELECTION 
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Nursery Stock and Garden Supplies 
for Beautiful Gardens 

We Specialize in Indoor Plants 

3860 Rosecrans San Diego 10 

Phone 296-6251 



1 



LA MESA NURSERY 

"Everything For The Garden" 

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Colorful Array of 

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Azaleas and Rhododendrons 

Dramatize the garden. 

Nightscape with 12 volt garden lighting. 

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8480 La Mesa Blvd. — 466-5703 



758 

Hillside Drive 

Overlooking La Jolla Shores, just 
up the hill from Torrey Pines Road, or 
down the hill from Mt. Soledad, is 
HILLSIDE NURSERY. Whichever ap- 
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House Plants — a wide variety of well 
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PHONE 297-4216 



APRIL - MAY, 1967 



27 



Fuchsias 

by Morrison W. Doty 

San Diego Fuchsia Society 



WITH the end of dormancy 
and pruning over, even in 
cool sections, by mid-March, 
there is lots to do for the Fuchsia 
grower now that is inspired by the 
happy surge of Spring growth every- 
where. First reminder should be for 
more frequent and regular watering, 
especially of all container plants, as 
these hot days often come now be- 
tween very cool foggy nights, plus 
warm winds that dry our plants out 
dangerously before it seems possible 
to new gardeners from the East. 

A finger test for dampness just un- 
der the surface of containers, every 
day or two in hot or windy weather 
is a good habit to acquire in caring 
for plants in this area. It could have 
saved many puzzling losses lately. It 
is well also to remember that different 
soil mixes retain moisture different 
lengths of time. Some plants you get 
from nurseries may have a very heavy 
soil perhaps to avoid too frequent 
watering, that you may wish to re- 
place with the mixture you have found 
to produce better results. 



There is usually a lot of repotting 
needed at this time, of old plants 
ready for larger containers, and of 
young ones in baskets or planters. 
Often containers that are not to be 
changed need fresh rich soil added for 
replacement of nutrients washed away 
in heavy watering. 

Simple potting mixtures such as 
equal parts of fine leaf mold, sandy 
loam and well rotted, weed-free cow 
manure, with perhaps a little bone 
and blood meal added, will usually 
produce excellent results with Fuchsias, 
for they are hearty feeders and very 
adaptable. Some good peat moss is 
advised instead of the leaf mold, 
and is all right, but if it is once al- 
lowed to dry out completely, it may 
be one contributing cause of the puz- 
zling plant losses. There are many 
other plant mixes, including the ad- 
dition of fir bark, sponge rock, rotted 
redwood shavings, etc. to lighten 
heavy soil mixes, and there are some 
fairly complete commercial replace- 
ment soil mixes, made in San Diego, 
that seems very good. We still recom- 



MISSION HILLS NURSERY 

Fane stock of newest basket and upright Fuchsias. 

Since 1924 We Give S&H Green Stamps Phone 295-2808 

1525 Fort Stockton Drive San Diego 92103 



454-0404 



CARLSON TRAVEL SERVICE, inc. 



1033 PROSPECT 



A TRAVEL-EXPERIENCED STAFF 

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA 92037 




P. O. BOX 1453 



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Announcing: 

MR. EDWARD HAIR STYLIST 
WITH CORY'S OF BEVERLY HILLS IN 

MISSION VALLEY CENTER 

Phone 297-4179 



1 
1 



mend simple mixes for amateur grow- 
ers that do include the natural humus 
so deficient in the soil of this area. 
In feeding, some like to start with 
one early dry fertilizer hi-nitrogen 
feeding, followed at first by liquid 
fish-base (also hi-nitrogen, like 10-5- 
5) to develop sturdy plants — then 
changing before blooming to a hi- 
phosphorus fish formula such as 4-10- 
8 to produce heavy bloom. One table- 
spoon good organic Fish Concentrate 
to a gallon of water applied a week 
apart for "fast-show" growth if de- 
sired, or every 2 to 3 weeks through- 
out the season, gives good results. 
Don't feed new cuttings. 

After pruning, early season pinching 
out of the tips of new growth is very 
important in shaping Fuchsia plants 
to their type and blooming potential. 
The pinched tips divide again and 
again for more abundant bloom, and 
that delay grows a sturdier plant, 
more pest-resistant and longer lived. 
Remember however, to stop the pinch- 
ing at least 2 or three weeks before 
you want blossoms to start setting on, 
for this makes slower growth. In the 
interest of keeping container plants 
to proper shape, some growers take 
cuttings of favorite varieties at various 
times all season for themselves, or 
garden friends, and put them in 2 in. 
plastic starting pots instead of flats, 
as they seem to root better in firmer 
containment. 

Early in the growing season also is 
a good time to start preventive spray- 
ing, for it allows the use of the milder 
safer solutions, such as pyrethrum, 
rotenone, lindane and nicotine sul- 
phate, rather than the highly toxic 
petroleum and poison-gas derivatives 
that have been developed in later 
years. Systemic insecticides, which 
are fed into the circulatory system 
of plants by being put into their 
soil are being urged upon growers 
just now, as the ultimate easy solution 
to rid the garden of most pests. Des- 
pite their remarkable advantages how- 
ever, it may be well not to abandon 
suddenly our sharp water spraying, 
and preventive application of the safe 
old insecticides mentioned, plus per- 
haps DDT and malathion as needed 
for the white fly, thrip, red spider 
mite or aphis that only occasionally 
afflicts the normally disease-free fuch- 
sia. Watch for the Santana warm 
winds of late April-early May, and 
hot dry days sometimes later, with 
watering every day and fogging if 
possible. It is the life of our little 
rain-forest plant, especially if planted 
in containers. 



28 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 




Richard Gabriel Chase 



200th Birthday 
Floral Committee 

by Joan Betts and Alice Zukor 



THE Floral Committee is moving 
right along firming floral plans 
to carry out our theme title for 
1969. To be the "Flower Basket of 
the Nation" every one must dig in 
and participate now in order to show 
visitors and residents alike what a 
beautiful City of Trees and Flowers, 
our San Diego can be! 

At the January 19th meeting firm 
dates of the larger Flower Shows and 
related floral events to record on the 
Master 200th Anniversary Calendar 
were given; Camellia Society — mid- 
dle of February, 1969: Orchid Society 
— approximately the middle of March 
1969: Rose Society — either the third 
or fourth Sunday in April, 1969; Iris 
Society — last Sunday in April or first 
in May. The Dahlia Society then 
proudly confirmed their show dates as 
August 2-3, 1969 when they hold their 
29th Annual Dahlia Show combined 
with the Pacific Southwest Conference 
which includes 11 California Dahlia 
Societies. It has been tentatively desig- 
nated as the national American Dahlia 
Show, a major Floral Exhibition and 
a tremendous addition to the major 
events of the 1969 celebration. We 
thank them and promise to assist in 
promoting their show plans. Early 
confirmation of all future dates is es- 
sential. There are only two more meet- 



ings, March and May before summer. 
It was a real privilege to have Dr. 
Samuel Ayres Jr. well-known speaker 
on horticulture come from Los An- 
geles on January 26th. His presen- 
tation "Flowering Trees and Flowering 
Shrubs to Celebrate with Color" with 
entirely new slides, was enthusiastically 
received and many purchased the beau- 
tiful booklets that we had requested 
him to bring. Dr. Ayres wrote us 
upon his return, of his gift to the 
people of San Diego of a 15 foot Floss 
Silk tree Chorisia speciosa from his 
own nursery. Councilmen Allen Hitch 
and J. Michael Schaffer, who attended 
the dinner and lecture, join with all 
San Diegans in appreciation of this 
living gift to our city. 

It is anticipated that the registration 
of our rose for the 1969 Celebration 
will be announced soon by the Amer- 
ican Rose Society. Armstrong Nur- 
series of Ontario have cooperated since 
May, 1966 to introduce for the Fall 
season 1968-69 their beautiful prize 
winning exhibition-form light yellow 
rose. The parentage is Helen Traubel 
X Tiffany. Of course our rose will 
be a winner, like Lucky Lady, this 
year's success from Armstrong. 

The Womens' Committee to the 
San Diego Symphony Association is 
sponsoring a 5,000 issue printing of 



the Green Thumb Calendar which has 
been revised to incorporate the 200th 
Anniversary Floral Calendar of Flow- 
ers, Plants and Trees, and spotlighting 
our rose for 1969. 

Through the inquiries of City Beau- 
tiful and the Civic Center Garden 
Clubs with the endorsement of this 
committee, Mr. E. C. Williams, County 
Tax Assessor, has announced in an 
official letter that "there will be no in- 
crease in assessed property valuation 
when residential plant-tree improve- 
ment or moderate additional land- 
scaping is undertaken." The tree and 
vine section of the tax bill is reserved 
solely for commercial groves of over 
one acre in size. This news will give 
extra encouragement to home land- 
scape improvement for 1969- 

It was a privilege on February 23 
to attend a special City Council meet- 
ing on behalf of progress reports for 
the Birthday celebration from all com- 
mittees. We reported our theme, large 
St. Francis of Assisi statues with flower 
baskets, made of permanent terracotta 
concrete placed in key locations on 
city land. The Council showed keen 
interest in this project and referred it 
to City Manager Walter Hahn for 
further study and report. They en- 
couraged the idea and were informed 
that when approved, these statues and 
baskets would be a continuous re- 
minder to our citizens of our theme 
in San Diego "Flower Basket of the 
Nation." A pilot project will display 
one in the near future for final Coun- 
cil and City approval. A dream com- 
ing true (like the naming of the City 
Rose, (a 9-month-long project) but 
very rewarding all the way. 

Another news flash as we go to 
press; — Mrs. Charles E. Domler, 
President, Pacific Beach Garden Club 
has announced their Club's project is 
to raise money toward expenses of 
the Floral Committee (hopefully, a 
project of their choosing directly re- 
lated to our Floral plants and plans.) 
Tremendous and so appreciated ! Mrs. 
Domler has also volunteered to speak 
to the 17 clubs and organizations of 
the Palomar District California Garden 
Clubs on all phases of the 200th An- 
niversary. Support such as this is so 
appreciated. 

In closing, we are most hopeful 
that with the combined efforts of 
Spain, the Park and Recreation De- 
partment, and The Botanic Garden 
Foundation, Inc. that our dream of 
many years — a large, complete Gar- 
den Center for San Diego will be a 
reality — in a very short period of 
time. 



APRIL - MAY, 1967 



29 



SAN DIEGO fLORAL ASSOCIATION 

FLORAL BUILDING, BALBOA PARK 

(Under the sponsorship of 
The Park and Recreation Dept., City of San Diego) 

Third Tuesday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Emmett W. Fowler, Jr. 454-1795 

1025 Havenhurst Dr., La Jolla 92037 

FLORAL COMMITTEE. 200th ANNIVERSARY, Inc. 

Bi-monthly, 3rd Thursday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Joan Betts, Chairman, Alice Zukor, Co-chairman 

291-1969 
1600 Pacific Hwy, Rm. 801, S.D., Cal. 92101 

SAN DIEGO BOTANICAL GARDEN 
FOUNDATION, Inc. 

Second Thursday, Floral Building 
P.O. Box 12162, S. D., Calif. 92112 
Pres.: Virgil Schade 298-1949 

1753 Myrtle 

FLOWER ARRANGERS' GUILD OF SAN DIEGO 

First Thursday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Edwin Gould 454-1519 

7065 Neptune PL, L.J. 92037 



AFFILIATE MEMBERS 1966 

CIVIC CENTER GARDEN CLUB 

Meets every Thursday, 12m to I p.m. 
Garden House, Grape and 101 Civic Center 

Pres.: Mrs. Donald A. Innis 298-1690 

1827 Puterbaugh, S.D. 92103 
Rep.: James Saraceno 274-2628 

3366 Lloyd St, S.D. 92117 

GENERAL DYNAMICS GARDEN CLUB 

First Wednesday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Robert Bradshaw 466-4877 

9654 Candy Lane, La Mesa 92040 
Rep. Dir.: J. E. Henderson 274-1754 

3503 Yosemite, S.D. 92109 

MEN'S GARDEN CLUB OF SAN DIEGO CO. 

Fourth Monday, Floral Bldg, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres. John G. Farleigh 295-5404 

2217 Whitman St, S.D. 92103 
Rep.: Dr. J. W. Troxell 282-9131 

4950 Canterbury Drive, S.D. 92116 

ORGANIC GARDENING CLUB 

Third Friday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Ferd I. Thebus 

4511 Mt. Gaywas Dr., S.D. 92117 
Rep.: Mrs. Mary Panek 

4680 Del Monte Ave, S.D. 92107 



POINT LOMA GARDEN CLUB 

First Friday, Floral Bldg, 10 a.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Philip Hardie 

3756 Kingsley, S.D. 92106 
Rep. Mrs. Louis J. Kulot 

2732 Azalea Dr., S.D. 92106 

SAN DIEGO BONSAI SOCIETY, INC. 

Second Sunday, Floral Bldg, 1-5 p.m. 

Pres.: Mas Takanashi 
6655 Detroit St, San Diego 

Rep.: Mrs. Helen G. Howe 
4767i/ 2 Lantana Dr., S.D. 92105 



277-6899 
222-5031 

223-9720 
222-5480 

264-8451 
281-1158 



SAN DIEGO CACTUS & SUCCULENT SOCIETY 

First Saturday, Floral Building, 2 p.m. 

Pres.: Reuben V. Vaughn 223-7629 

1041 Le Roy St, S.D. 92106 

Rep.: Frank Mousseau 
5955 Lauretta, S.D. 92110 295-9596 

SAN DIEGO CAMELLIA SOCIETY 

Second Friday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Samuel E. Foster 444-5314 

202 Carter, E| Cajon 92020 
Rep.: Mrs. Lester Crowder 295-5871 

3130 Second St, S.D. 92103 

S.D. CHAPTER CALIF. ASS'N NURSERYMEN 

Second and Fourth Thursday, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: John Basney 273-4636 

4731 Conrad Ave, S.D. 92117 
Rep.: John Basney 273-4636 

4731 Conrad Ave, S.D. 92117 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY DAHLIA SOCIETY 

Fourth Tuesday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Gerald L. Lohmann 295-7645 

4564i/ 2 Arizona St, S.D. 92116 
Rep.: Mrs. R. M. Middleton 296-3246 

3944 Centre St, S.D. 92103 

SD-IMPERIAL COUNTIES IRIS SOCIETY 

Meets 3rd Sunday, Floral Bldg. 2:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Arthur B. Day 422-5172 

279 J St. Chula Vista 92010 
Rep.: Arthur B. Day 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY ORCHID SOCIETY 

First Tuesday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: James C. Laughter 477-0570 

5937 Cumberland St, S.D. 921 14 
Rep.: Byron Geer 279-1 191 

5094 Mt. La Platta Dr., S.D. 92117 

SAN DIEGO FUCHSIA SOCIETY 

Second Monday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: William C. Knotts 277-1188 

1912 David St, S.D. 921 1 1 
Rep.: Mrs. William Knotts 

1912 David St, S.D. 921 1 I 277-1188 



SAN DIEGO ROSE SOCIETY 

Third Monday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Harry B. Cutler 466-7579 

4671 Toni Lane, S.D. 
Rep.: Mrs. Felix White 264-4440 

5282 Imperial Ave, S.D. 92114 

SOUTHWESTERN GROUP, JUDGES' COUNCIL 
CALIFORNIA GARDEN CLUBS, INC. 

First Wednesday, Floral Building, 10:30 a.m 

Pres.: Mrs. Harry K. Ford 583-4320 

4851 Lorraine Dr., S.D. 921 15 
Rep.: Mrs. Roland S. Hoyt 296-2757 

2271 Ft. Stockton Dr. S.D. 92103 



OTHER GARDEN CLUBS 

ALFRED D. ROBINSON BEGONIA SOCIETY 

Third Friday, Homes of Members, 10 a.m. 

Pres.: Miss Myrle Patterson 224-1572 

4310 Piedmont Dr., S.D. 92107 

BERNARDO BEAUTIFUL & GARDEN CLUB 

First Wednesday, 1:30 Seven Oaks Community 
Center, Bernardo Oaks Dr., Rancho Bernardo 

Pres.: Fred W. Walters 748-1486 

12048 Callado Dr., S.D. 92128 

CARLSBAD GARDEN CLUB 

First Friday, VFW Hall, Carlsbad, 1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Wanda Bond 
VFW Hall, Pio Pico & Oak St, Carlsbad 92008 

CHULA VISTA FUCHSIA SOCIETY 

Second Tuesday, Norman Park Recreation 
Center, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mr. August H. Goerke 420-3930 

481 Flower. Chula Vista 921 10 

CHULA VISTA GARDEN CLUB 

Meets 3rd Wednesday 1:00 p.m. 

C.V. Woman's Club Bldg, 357 G St, C.V 

Pres.: Mrs. M. D. Holmes 422-0490 

68 E. Sierra Way, C.V. 92010 

CLAIREMONT GARDEN CLUB 

Meets Third Tuesday, 9:30 a.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Stanley Fletcher 276-2520 

3090 Chicago St, S.D. 92117 

CORONADO FLORAL ASSOCIATION 

Meets 1st Tuesday, Red Cross Bldg, 1113 Adella 

Lane 
Pres.: Capt. Richard W. Parker, U.S.N. Retired 

435-6454 
508 Glorietta Blvd., Coronado 921 18 

CROSS-TOWN GARDEN CLUB 

Fourth Tuesday. E. San Diego Woman's Club 
4037 39th St, S.D. 92115, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Charles Williams 284-2317 

4240 46th, S.D. 92115 

CROWN GARDEN CLUB OF CORONADO 

Fourth Thursday, Red Cross Bldg, 1113 Adella 
Lane, 9:30 a.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Robert H. Keehn 435-8268 

1 1 I I Coronado, Coronado 921 18 

DELCADIA GARDEN CLUB 

First Wednesday, Encinitas Union Elementary 
School, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. I. F. Nichols 753-5409 

159 Diana, Leucadia 92046 

DOS VALLES GARDEN CLUB (PAUMA VLY.) 

Meets 2nd Tuesday, Pauma Valley Center 1:30 

Pres.: Mrs. William C. Myers 742-3325 

Country Club Dr., Pauma Valley 92061 

ESCONDIDO GARDEN CLUB 

3rd Friday, Veterans Memorial Hall 1:00 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Victor F. Forrester 745-9657 

Reidy Canyon Rd, Escondido 92025 

FALLBROOK GARDEN CLUB 

Last Thursday, Fallbrook Woman's Clubhouse 
1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Roman E. Shore 728-7044 

1211 Pepper Tree Lane, Fallbrook 92028 

GROSSMONT GARDEN CLUB 

Second Monday, La Mesa Chamber of Commerce 
Bldg, University Ave, La Mesa 92041 

Pres.: Mrs. Raymond Moore 466-6943 

4679 Harbison Ave, La Mesa 92041 

IMPERIAL BEACH GARDEN CLUB 

3rd Tuesday, Imperial Beach Civic Center 
1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Alice Loomis 424-7235 

874 Fourth, Imperial Beach 92032 

LAKESIDE GARDEN CLUB 

2nd Monday, Lakeside Farm School, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Louis Griffin 448-4199 

12024 Lakeside Ave, Lakeside 92040 

LA MESA GARDEN CLUB 

(Garden Sec. Womans' Club) 

3rd Thursday, La Mesa Women's Club, 1:00 pm 

Pres.: Mrs. J. Wells Hershey 448-6396 

11928 Orchard Road, Lakeside 92040 

LAS JARDINERAS 

Third Monday, 10 a.m. Homes of members 

Pres.: Mrs. James I. Robinson 223-0125 

3443 Whittier St, S.D. 92106 



LEMON GROVE WOMAN'S CLUB 

(Garden Section) 

First Tuesday, Lemon Grove Woman's Club 

House, I p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. James H. Sharp 466-8300 

8124 Alton Dr., Lemon Grove 92045 

MISSION GARDEN CLUB 

Meets First Monday, 8 p.m. 

Barbour Hall, Pershing and University 

Pres.: Dr. R. J. McBride 465-1311 

4635 Panorama Drive, La Mesa 
Rep.: Julia Bohe 282-7422 

3145 No. Mt. View Dr., S.D. 921 16 

NATIONAL CITY GARDEN CLUB 

Third Wednesday, National City Community 
Bldg, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Arliss A. Agnew 477-8416 

420 L St, National City 92050 

NORTH COUNTY ROSE SOCIETY 

Meets First Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. at 
Palomar College 

Pres.: James A. Kirk 748-3870 

15131 Espola Road, Poway 

NORTH COUNTY SHADE PLANT CLUB 

Second Sat, 1:00 p.m. Seacoast Hall, Encinitas 

Pres.: H. Marshall Chadwell 755-9219 

R. I Box M32, Del Mar 92014 

O. C. IT GROW GARDEN CLUB 

Second Wednesday, S. Oceanside School 
Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mr. Earl H. McPherson 729-1785 

3476 Pio Pico Dr., Carslbad, Calif. 92008 

PACIFIC BEACH GARDEN CLUB 

Meet second Monday, 7:30 p.m. Community 
Club House, Gresham and Diamond Sts., 
Pacific Beach 
Pres.: Mrs. Charles E. Domler 283-3642 

5158 Hastings Rd, S.D. 92116 

PALOMAR CACTUS & SUCCULENT SOCIETY 

Third Saturday, I p.m., Palomar College Foreign 
Language Building, Room F22 

Pres. Mrs. Katie McReynolds 755-4047 

P.O. Box III, Del Mar 92014 

PALOMAR ORCHID SOCIETY 

Meets Third Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., Avocado 
Inn, 114 Hillside Terrace, Vista 
Pres.: Eugene A. Casey 753-3571 

932 Crest Drive, Encinitas 

POWAY VALLEY GARDEN CLUB 

2nd Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. Community Church 

Pres. Mrs. Leo Ostrom 748-3708 

15222 Hilltop Circle, Poway 92064 

RANCHO SANTE FE GARDEN CLUB 

Second Tuesday — Club House, 2:00 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. John E. Grimm 756-1106 

P. O. Box 241, Rancho Santa Fe 92067 

SAN CARLOS GARDEN CLUB 

Fourth Tuesday, San Carlos Club, 6955 Golfcrest 
Drive 

Pres. Mrs. Glenn F. Bliss 463-4349 

6275 Cowles Mountain, San Diego 92119 

SAN DIEGO BRANCH AMERICAN 
BEGONIA SOCIETY 

Fourth Monday, Barbour Hall - Univ & 
Pershing, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Eugene Cooper 295-7938 

4444 Arista Dr., S.D. 92103 

SAN DIEGO BROMELIAD SOCIETY 

Second Monday, 7:30 p.m. Meets at home of 
president 

Pres.: Mrs. Cleoves Hardin 469-3038 

9295 Harness Rd, Spring Valley 92077 

SAN DIEGUITO GARDEN CLUB 

Third Wednesday, Seacoast Savings Building, 
Encinitas, 10 a.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Waldo Vogt 755-4772 

773 Barbara Ave, Solana Beach 92075 

SAN MIGUEL BRANCH AMERICAN 
BEGONIA SOCIETY 

First Wed, Youth Center, Lemon Grove 

Pres.: Ferris Jones 466-0138 

4610 68th St, S.D. 

SANTA MARIA VALLEY GARDEN CLUB 

Second Monday, Ramona Women's Club House, 
5th and Main, 9:30 a.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. W. F. Squibb 789-1157 

161 Steffy Lane, Ramona 92065 
SWEETWATER JUNIOR GARDEN CLUB 
First Monday, 7:30 p.m. Meets at home of 
Temporary President 
Temp. Pres.: Cleoves Hardin 469-3038 

9195 Harness Rd, Spring Valley 92077 
VALLE GARDEN CLUB, POWAY 
Meets 3rd Thursday, 10 a.m. Homes of members 
Pres.: Mrs. Brown Thompson Ml 
16728 Espola Rd, Poway 92064 
VISTA GARDEN CLUB 
First Friday, Vista Rec. Center 1:00 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Henry C. Shultz 
1847 Alta Vista Dr., Vista 92083 
VISTA MESA GARDEN CLUB 
Second Tuesday, 2 p.m. Family Association 
Center 
Pres.: Mrs. Clara Haskins 465-0910 

2352 El Prado, Lemon Grove 92045 





Hybrid Cattleya 
Showing twenty-five flowers on one plant. 



Noni of Tahiti in Doctor Creutz' green house 
with Hybrid Cattleya. 





Epidendrum from Paracutin, Mexico 
at the site of the volcano. 



Hybrid Paphiopedilum. These fine orchids are often called 
cypripediums because of their similarity to that group. 



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